American Syndicalism: The I. W. W

By John Graham Brooks | Go to book overview

XV

THE DISAPPEARANCE OF THE CAPITALIST

No practical question in the future of Socialism will excite more vehement controversy than that of "compensation." What Socialism wants and is determined to get is now largely possessed by what is loosely called the capitalist class. Like the ownership of land this control of the machinery of production is thought to give the possessors an almost unlimited power over the lives and destinies of those who are without property. It is this dependence and insecurity that accounts largely for the increasing hostility to the "wage-system." No analogy is so frequent as that of the slave relation under this system.

The remedy which Socialism brings is to get the land and all the vast mechanism embodied in transportation, mill, factory and mine away from its present holders. The people are themselves to own and use these wealth-producers in the common interest.

We shall see more clearly what the I. W. W. propose and also what they are likely to do, so far as they get power, if we dwell a moment on the more general attitude of socialism toward compensation.

If it is to take over "land and the means of production," it is fair to press the question: how is this to be done? There are plenty of socialists of conservative temper who reply that experience from a dozen countries furnishes all the answer we require. We have already

-179-

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American Syndicalism: The I. W. W
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Prefatory Note iii
  • Contents v
  • I- The Socialist Invasion 1
  • II - The More Immediate Danger 12
  • III - The Enlargement of the Problem 25
  • IV - The Plague of Misconceptions 33
  • V - A History of Disappointment 47
  • VI - Forerunners of the I. W. W. 61
  • VII - The I. W. W. 73
  • VIII - General Characteristics 92
  • IX - The War of the Classes 107
  • X - The General Strike 115
  • XI - "Direct Action" 129
  • XII - Sabotage 139
  • XIII - Violence 158
  • XIV - Anarchism 168
  • XV - The Disappearance of the Capitalist 179
  • XVI - Constructive Suggestion 194
  • XVII - Some Effects of Responsibility 215
  • XIX - Some Duties of Our Own 239
  • Literature 253
  • Index 257
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