The Early Christian Church - Vol. 1

By Philip Carrington | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 21
HERMAS AND HIS ANGEL

The literary traditions, p.391. The date of Hermas, p.392. Inspiration and vision, p.393. Hermas and Rhoda, p.394. The elder lady, p.396. The Italian Sibyl, p.396. Hermas the prophet, p.397. The family of Hermas, p.398. The vision of the tower, p.399. The gnosis of Hermas, p.401. The appearance of the Shepherd, p.403. The commandments (Mandata), p.404. The moral theology of Hermas, p.405. The parables (Similitudines), p.406. The dedication of the tower, p.407. Hermas as literature, p.408.


THE LITERARY TRADITIONS

As we come to the close of the second apostolic generation we cannot help being impressed by its vigorous and creative character and by the variety in the types of Christianity which it develops. The task of the third generation will be to blend these various apostolic types into the harmony which is known as catholicism. We know of four Gospels, for instance, each of which represents a local apostolic tradition; what we do not know is how they came to be combined in one book, and received by the catholic church as The Gospel; but the creative phase of apostolic Christianity is not complete until this is done. And this, in its turn, is part of the larger process in which the various apostolic traditions were combined into a catholic or universal pattern.

Among these traditions were the liturgy, the creeds, the sacraments, the ministries, and so forth; but none was more important than the making of the New Testament.

When the outline and shape of the New Testament become visible in the second century, it is in some respects larger than we would expect; for it carries Clement and Hermas with it. It was not a question of including them in it; it was a question of detaching them from it. They circulated from the first with the rest of the church literature, to which Syria contributed Matthew, Asia the Johannine writings, and Greece (quite likely) the writings of Luke.

There was no New Testament at first. There was a church literature of an apostolic or ecclesiastical or prophetic character, made by inspired men to serve the needs of the time. It survived because it did serve the

-391-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Early Christian Church - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 520

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.