Principles and Practices of Performance Assessment

By Nidhi Khattri; Alison L. Reeve et al. | Go to book overview

Foreword
Studies of Education Reform, a U.S. Department of Education-funded examination of 12 of the most important strategies of education reform, was planned in 1990, while I served as Assistant Secretary for Educational Research and Improvement. The set of 12 studies was intended to explore some of the most important areas and issues in education reform--including systemic reform, educational technology, school-to-work initiatives, school-based management, and curriculum reform--that emerged in the 1980s and early 1990s, and to show how those various reforms fit together. It gives me great satisfaction to write this foreword to a book reporting on the findings of one of those 12 studies.The authors of Principles and Practices of Performance Assessment took the opportunity created by the Department's support to conduct what is, to the best of my knowledge, the broadest investigation of the characteristics of performance assessments and their impacts at the school level. In their careful exploration of a diverse set of 16 schools--where teachers and students are using an equally diverse set of performance assessments--the authors explore some of the major issues confronting policymakers and educators as they set about introducing new forms of assessment. Looking at the intersection between the performance assessment and the school, the authors describe:
The characteristics of the several types of assessment techniques that have come collectively to be known as "performance assessment" or "authentic assessment."
The facilitators of and barriers to the implementation of performance assessments at the state, district, and school levels.
The factors that affect teachers' "appropriation" of performance assessments, or, in other words, teachers' ability to take new forms of assessment and adapt them for use in their own classrooms.
The impacts of those assessments on teaching practice and learning.

The assessments they investigate include those developed and introduced at all levels of the educational enterprise: state departments of education, district offices, and schools themselves, as well as assessments promoted by national groups such as the New Standards Project, the Coalition of Essential Schools, and the College Board. The authors show how assessments initiated at these

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Principles and Practices of Performance Assessment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1- Introduction 1
  • 2- Characteristics of Performance Assessments 15
  • 3- Facilitators and Barriers In Assessment Reform 62
  • 4- Teacher Appropriation Of Performance Assessments 85
  • 5- Impact of Performance Assessments on Teaching And Learning 119
  • 6- Assessment Reform: Findings And Implications 143
  • Appendix A- Study Objectives and Design 165
  • Appendix C 233
  • References 237
  • Author Index 241
  • Subject Index 243
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