CHAPTER XIX.

T HE library looked tranquil enough as I entered it, and the Sybil -- if Sybil she were -- was seated snugly enough in an easy-chair at the chimney corner. She had on a red cloak and a black bonnet: or rather, a broad-brimmed gipsyhat, tied down with a striped handkerchief under her chin. An extinguished candle stood on the table; she was bending over the fire, and seemed reading in a little black book, like a prayer-book, by the light of the blaze: she muttered the words to herself, as most old women do, while she read; she did not desist immediately on my entrance: it appeared she wished to finish a paragraph.

I stood on the rug and warmed my hands, which were rather cold with sitting at a distance from the drawing-room fire. I felt now as composed as ever I did in my life: there was nothing indeed in the gipsy's appearance to trouble one's calm. She shut her book and slowly looked up; her hat-brim partially shaded her face, yet I could see, as she raised it, that it was a strange one. It looked all brown and black: elf-locks bristled out from beneath a white band which passed under her chin, and came half over her cheeks or rather jaws; her eye confronted me at once with a bold and direct gaze.

"Well, and you want your fortune told?" she said in a voice as decided as her glance, as harsh as her features.

"I don't care about it, mother; you may please yourself: but I ought to warn you -- I have no faith."

"It's like your impudence to say so: I expected it of you: I heard it in your step as you crossed the threshold."

"Did you? You've a quick ear." "I have; and a quick eye, and a quick brain."

"You need them all in your trade."

"I do; especially when I've customers like you to deal with. Why don't you tremble?"

"I'm not cold."

"Why don't you turn pale?"

"I'm not sick."

"Why don't you consult my art?"

"I'm not silly."

-207-

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Jane Eyre
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The English Comédíe Humaíne *
  • Title Page iii
  • Publishers' Note v
  • List of Illustrations vii
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 8
  • Chapter III 15
  • Chapter IV 24
  • Chapter V 39
  • Chapter VI 52
  • Chapter VII 60
  • Chapter VIII 69
  • Chapter IX 77
  • Chapter X 85
  • Chapter XI 96
  • Chapter XII 113
  • Chapter XIII 124
  • Chapter XIV 135
  • Chapter XV 148
  • Chapter XVI 160
  • Chapter XVII 170
  • Chapter XVIII 191
  • Chapter XIX 207
  • Chapter XX 217
  • Chapter XXI 233
  • Chapter XXII 255
  • Chapter XXIII 262
  • Chapter XXIV 273
  • Chapter XXV 292
  • Chapter XXVI 305
  • Chapter XXVII 316
  • Chapter XXVIII 344
  • Chapter XXIX 361
  • Chapter XXX 373
  • Chapter XXXI 383
  • Chapter XXXII 391
  • Chapter XXXIII 403
  • Chapter XXXIV 416
  • Chapter XXXV 440
  • Chapter XXXVI 451
  • Chapter XXXVII 461
  • Chapter XXXVIII 482
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