Technology Assessment in Education and Training

By Eva L. Baker; Harold F. O'Neil Jr. | Go to book overview

Preface

This is the first book of a two-volume set on technology assessment (see also O'Neil & Baker, 1994). Our intention is to capture the best evidence to date of the useful strategies to judge the future utility of technology. As the reader will see, some of the chapters straddle the boundary between evaluating a particular case of technology and broader conceptions of assessment. In chapters that report the evaluation of particular developments, the view to the future is often vague and left to the reader to infer in greater detail. For other chapters, however, there is a clear effort to present and review particular methods by which technologies in general may be evaluated. Three different approaches are taken by authors: analytic models, empirical summaries, and reports of development and evaluation.

It becomes obvious that it is almost impossible to meet the day-to-day demands of deadlines, software glitches, resource development, and empirical research, and to keep one's eye on the future of the field's progress. Conceptual bifocals are needed. Nonetheless, the authors in this volume represent a selection of the very best thinkers and actors in the practice of technology research, development, and evaluation. Trained as psychologists, their particular areas of expertise differ substantially and include cognitive, developmental, instructional, psychometric, and educational specialties. Most have decided to work in a particular environment--postgraduate, military, elementary, or secondary school. Together they present a wide array of approaches, from deep qualitative analysis, to classroom observation, performance assessment, or controlled experimentation. Evidence of validity is presented by some in tight frameworks and by others in freewheeling empiricism.

From their efforts we can learn our status in a representative set of important

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Technology Assessment in Education and Training
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.