Frontiers of Medicine in the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, 1899-1940

By Heather Bell | Go to book overview

2
Medical Policy and Medical Practitioners

This chapter provides an overview of the medical administration in the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan between 1899 and 1940, arguing that the distinctive form of colonialism developed in Sudan, and outlined in Chapter 1, shaped the medical services provided. The chapter begins by charting the shifting goals of the medical department/service, showing how they paralleled the changing ambitions of the colonial state, and goes on to highlight the colonial financial and human resource limitations that constrained medical activity. The second half of the chapter discusses the different categories of personnel who practised Western medicine on behalf of the colonial state. Analysis of biographical information about British military and civilian doctors and their terms of service suggests that both groups were middle class, well educated, and enjoyed financial and social standing comparable to their political counterparts. A discussion of Syrian and Sudanese medical personnel demonstrates clearly the way in which political and economic policies influenced who delivered which medical services in different parts of the country at particular points in time. It also shows that British doctors' perception of racial difference, and their class, gender, and occupation hierarchies structured the training of Sudanese medical personnel and the medical service, counterbalancing the fluidity of the boundary drawn around the profession of medicine in Sudan.


MEDICAL ADMINISTRATION

The development of the Sudan medical department, renamed the Sudan medical service in 1924, mirrored the development of political administration and broadly reflected the government's political priorities. Military staffing and military leadership of civil medicine in Sudan remained a fact of life until the First World War, and military control over civilian medical care persisted into the 1920s in some provinces. As in the political realm, senior doctors were British men, seconded from the Royal Army Medical Corps to the Egyptian Army Medical Corps (EAMC), while junior doctors were mainly Syrian, but also Egyptian, men hired directly

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Frontiers of Medicine in the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, 1899-1940
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations x
  • Contents xi
  • Abbreviations xii
  • GLOSSARY xiv
  • I- The Boundaries of Colonial Medicine 1
  • 2: Medical Policy and Medical Practitioners 22
  • 3- The Wellcome Tropical Research Laboratories and the Organization Of Research 55
  • Conclusion 88
  • Conclusion 124
  • 5- Sleeping Sickness and the Ordering Of the South 127
  • Conclusion 161
  • 6- The International Construction Of Yellow Fever 163
  • Conclusion 195
  • 7- Midwifery Training and the Politics Of Female Circumcision 198
  • Conclusion 226
  • 8- Conclusion 229
  • Bibliography 234
  • Index 255
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