Frontiers of Medicine in the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, 1899-1940

By Heather Bell | Go to book overview

again doubtful.' Bryant had little time for Sudanese views of nets as 'irreligious' or to be avoided because of their association with prostitutes. But despite his pessimism, he supported public health education about the benefits of netting and thought much could be gained if prominent Sudanese led by example.113

While Westerners were at this time being condemned for infection with schistosomiasis, medical observation on malaria promoted the positive colonial attitude toward Westerners described by Duffield. Here was a full elaboration of the mythology of the fit Westerner, whose labour was so crucial to the operation of the Gezira scheme: 'Their stature, the muscular development of many, and the magnificent chests and shoulders of not a few dwarf in development and vigour the weed manhood of the arab village.' This physical superiority was not considered inherent, but was attributed by some to a diet containing more meat and protein-rich corn. Casual observation suggested that West Africans had lower splenomegaly rates, which Bryant traced to their superior physiques, and to the smoky fires around which they gathered each night, which kept away mosquitoes.114 Bryant also pointed to living conditions in villages generally as favourable to the spread of malaria: 'cool, dark, badly ventilated' huts, some crowded with 'ophthalmic children and mangey, helminth infested dogs, sheep . . .' and often malarious people, were ideal for harbouring mosquitoes.115 These observations did not, however, translate into a new approach to malaria control based on housing and nutritional reform. While the SMS was obviously willing to intervene in the lives of Sudanese to the point of using police to forcibly assemble them for malaria surveys, intervention much beyond that point seems to have been considered too costly in terms both of money and of the goodwill required for the operation of the scheme. Bryant's report was not a blueprint for action, but it does provide insight into the racial perceptions which were influencing, and being influenced by, doctors in the Gezira.


CONCLUSION

The Sudan government undertook a distinctly colonial project of social, economic, and geographical transformation in the Gezira, carving the landscape into tenancies and canals, and remaking the way that people lived and worked. The Gezira was distinctive territory, in terms of its physical appearance, the system of production that it harboured, and its

____________________
113
Annual Report of the Gezira Malariologist, 12. June 1930, 9.

-124-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Frontiers of Medicine in the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, 1899-1940
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations x
  • Contents xi
  • Abbreviations xii
  • GLOSSARY xiv
  • I- The Boundaries of Colonial Medicine 1
  • 2: Medical Policy and Medical Practitioners 22
  • 3- The Wellcome Tropical Research Laboratories and the Organization Of Research 55
  • Conclusion 88
  • Conclusion 124
  • 5- Sleeping Sickness and the Ordering Of the South 127
  • Conclusion 161
  • 6- The International Construction Of Yellow Fever 163
  • Conclusion 195
  • 7- Midwifery Training and the Politics Of Female Circumcision 198
  • Conclusion 226
  • 8- Conclusion 229
  • Bibliography 234
  • Index 255
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 266

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.