CHAPTER X

"I DON'T know horses," Saxon said. "I've never been on one's back, and the only ones I've tried to drive were single, and lame, or almost falling down, or something. But I'm not afraid of horses. I just love them. I was born loving them, I guess."

Billy threw an admiring, appreciative glance at her.

"That's the stuff. That's what I like in a woman -- grit. Some of the girls I've had out -- well, take it from me, they made me sick. Oh, I'm hep to 'em. Nervous, an' trembly, an' screechy, an' wabbly. I reckon they come out on my account an' not for the ponies. But me for the brave kid that likes the ponies. You're the real goods, Saxon, honest to God you are. Why, I can talk like a streak with you. The rest of 'em make me sick. I'm like a clam. They don't know nothin', an' they're that scared all the time -- well, I guess you get me."

"You have to be born to love horses, maybe," she answered. "Maybe it's because I always think of my father on his roan war-horse that makes me love horses. But, anyway, I do. When I was a little girl I was drawing horses all the time. My mother always encouraged me. I've a scrapbook mostly filled with horses I drew when I was little. Do you know, Billy, sometimes I dream I actually own a horse, all my own. And lots of times I dream I'm on a horse's back, or driving him."

"I'll let you drive 'em, after a while, when they've worked their edge off. They're pullin' now. -- There, put your hands in front of mine -- take hold tight. Feel that? Sure you feel it. An' you ain't feelin' it all by a long shot. I don't dast slack, you bein' such a lightweight."

Her eyes sparkled as she felt the apportioned pull of

-75-

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The Valley of the Moon
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page vii
  • The Valley of the Moon 3
  • Chapter II 10
  • Chapter III 19
  • Chapter IV 27
  • Chapter V 41
  • Chapter VI 45
  • Chapter VII 53
  • Chapter VIII 61
  • Chapter IX 68
  • Chapter X 75
  • Chapter XI 87
  • Chapter XII 99
  • Chapter XIII 104
  • Chapter XIV 110
  • Chapter XV 117
  • Chapter I 125
  • Chapter II 131
  • Chapter III 139
  • Chapter IV 145
  • Chapter V 152
  • Chapter VI 159
  • Chapter VII 166
  • Chapter VIII 177
  • Chapter IX 186
  • Chapter X 193
  • Chapter XI 202
  • Chapter XII 214
  • Chapter XIII 224
  • Chapter XIV 234
  • Chapter XV 246
  • Chapter XVI 257
  • Chapter XVII 270
  • Chapter XVIII 282
  • Chapter XIX 292
  • Chapter I 303
  • Chapter II 315
  • Chapter III 327
  • Chapter IV 348
  • Chapter V 359
  • Chapter VI 370
  • Chapter VII 377
  • Chapter VIII 389
  • Chapter IX 401
  • Chapter X 412
  • Chapter XI 420
  • Chapter XII 437
  • Chapter XIII 443
  • Chapter XIV 453
  • Chapter XV 463
  • Chapter XVI 469
  • Chapter XVII 476
  • Chapter XVIII 486
  • Chapter XIX 496
  • Chapter XX 503
  • Chapter XXI 512
  • Chapter XXII 520
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