White Man's Justice: South African Political Trials in the Black Consciousness Era

By Michael Lobban | Go to book overview

8
Breaking the Structures: Terrorism Trials after the Soweto Uprising

Gwala's case showed that, where there seemed to be hard evidence against defendants, a court might be reluctant to reject the evidence by casting doubt on its reliability and questioning its origins. Given the evidence, however tarnished, a court would convict; and after June 1976, the courts were in many ways spoiled for evidence, for very many cases came to court with clear evidence against the accused. In this context, one might expect that the state would no longer have felt the need to fish for grand conspiracies, and that the courts would no longer have felt the imperative to build convictions on weak foundations. With the wealth of evidence, one might have expected fewer contentious trials. However, as will be seen in this chapter, this did not occur. While there was a flood of trials involving ANC and PAC structures where there was solid evidence against the accused, the state continued to seek to prosecute even very minor cases to deter those who even dreamed of seeking recruitment. At the same time, the state sought to reveal grand conspiracies which united the exiled revolutionary organizations and the student's movements at home. In this situation, judicial attitudes varied. As will become evident in a comparison of the trial of the ANC 'Pretoria Twelve' and the PAC 'Bethal' trial, much depended on the individual judge. In the former case, the judge reasoned closely, and refused to accept the state's grander conspiracy; in the latter, the judge handled the case in a way highly favourable to the state.


The Flood of Terrorism Trials

In the aftermath of the Soweto riots, the trickle of those who sought to leave the country to join the revolutionary liberation movements rapidly turned into a flood. With up to 450 fleeing the country each month in the second part of 1976,1 and with more than 12,000 refugees leaving the country, the ranks of the exiled movements-particularly the ANC-

____________________
1
The figure is given by S. M. Davis, Apartheid's Rebels ( New Haven, Conn., 1987), 56.

-193-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
White Man's Justice: South African Political Trials in the Black Consciousness Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 288

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.