Definitions: Essays in Contemporary Criticism

By Henry Seidel Canby | Go to book overview

DEFINITIONS
ESSAYS IN CONTEMPORARY CRITICISM

BY HENRY SEIDEL CANBY, Ph.D. Editor of The Literary Review of The New York Evening Post, and a member of the English Department of Yale University

NEW YORK HARCOURT, BRACE AND COMPANY

-iii-

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Definitions: Essays in Contemporary Criticism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • I - On Fiction 1
  • Sentimental America 3
  • Free Fiction 19
  • A Certain Condescension Toward Fiction 40
  • The Essence of Popularity 56
  • II - On the American Tradition 75
  • The American Tradition 77
  • Back to Nature 92
  • Thanks to the Artists 109
  • To-Day in American Literature: Addressed to the British 112
  • Time's Mirror 128
  • The Family Magazine 132
  • III - The New Generation 147
  • The Young Romantics 149
  • Puritans All 164
  • The Older Generation 167
  • A Literature of Protest 170
  • Barbarians à La Mode 174
  • IV - The Reviewing of Books 183
  • A Prospectus for Criticism 185
  • The Race of Reviewers 195
  • The Sins of Reviewing 203
  • Mrs. Wharton's "The Age Of Innocence" 212
  • Mr. Hergesheimer's "Cytherea" 217
  • V - Philistines and Dilettante 225
  • Poetry for the Unpoetical 227
  • Eye, Ear, and Mind 243
  • Out with the Dilettante 246
  • Flat Prose 249
  • VI - Men and Their Books 255
  • Conrad and Melville 257
  • The Novelist of Pity 269
  • Henry James 278
  • The Satiric Rage of Butler 282
  • VII - Conclusion 289
  • Defining the Indefinable 291
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