The Old European Order, 1660-1800

By William Doyle | Go to book overview
10. States and their Business (cont'd)
The Business of Government238
11. The Machinery of State241
Armies241
Navies245
Justice and Police248
Financial Institutions250
Administrative Centralization253
Central Authority257
Policy-Making and Opposition260
12. International Relations265
Diplomacy: the Ends265
Diplomacy: the Means267
Louis XIV269
The Spanish Succession272
The Rise of Great Britain274
The Decline of the Dutch Republic and Sweden275
The Emergence of Russia278
The Struggle for Italy and the Retreat of Austrian Power279
The Emergence of Prussia282
The Diplomatic Revolution283
Anglo-French Rivalry286
Poland and the Eastern Question288
The French Collapse290
THE CRISIS OF THE OLD ORDER
13. The Crisis295
Untouched Areas296
The British Empire290
The Habsburg Empire305
Northern Europe310
France: the Collapse of the Old Order312
14. Europe in Revolution321
1789: the Transfer of Power322
Revolutions Averted and Aborted, 1789-92327
France: the Revolutionary Consensus and its Collapse330
Europe at War, 1792-7335
Republicanism and Terror340
Reaction and Terror347

-xvii-

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The Old European Order, 1660-1800
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • THE SHORT OXFORD HISTORY OF THE MODERN WORLD i
  • THE SHORT OXFORD HISTORY OF THE MODERN WORLD ii
  • Title Page iii
  • CHRISSIE'S BOOK vii
  • GENERAL EDITOR'S PREFACE ix
  • Preface xiii
  • PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION xiv
  • Contents xv
  • INTRODUCTORY 1
  • ECONOMY 3
  • 1- Fundamentals: Population, Prices, and Agriculture 5
  • 2- Motors of Progress: Towns, Money, and Manufactures 28
  • 3- Wider Horizons: Trade And Empire 47
  • SOCIETY 71
  • 4. Ruling Orders 73
  • 5. the Ruled: the Country 96
  • 6. the Ruled: the Town 126
  • ENLIGHTENMENT 149
  • 7. Religion and the Churches 151
  • 8. the Progress of Doubt 174
  • PUBLIC AFFAIRS 219
  • 10. States and Their Business 221
  • 11. the Machinery of State 241
  • 12. International Relations 265
  • THE CRISIS OF THE OLD ORDER 293
  • 13. the Crisis 295
  • 15. the Revolutionary Impact 357
  • Bibliography 379
  • TABLE 401
  • Index 405
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