Deregulating the Public Service: Can Government Be Improved?

By John J. Diiulio Jr. | Go to book overview

Appendix:
Excerpts from
Commission Reports

THE National Commission on the Public Service ( Volcker commission), the National Commission on the State and Local Public Service (Winter commission), and the National Performance Review, chaired by Vice President Al Gore, have recommended deregulating the public service and otherwise reforming the way government operates.1 Reprinted here are relevant portions of the reports of these commissions.


Volcker Commission (1989)

The Commission makes the following recommendations to further enhance (the Federal Office of Personnel Management's, OPM's) agenda for change: First, OPM should continue to deregulate the hiring process by giving departments and agencies broad, but conditional, authority to set their own rules, as well as through aggressive use and expansion of existing authority to experiment and continued use of advisory and clearing-house mechanisms to share information across government . . .

Create a system that gives managers the authority they need to manage. The current system--or, as some maintain, nonsystem--removes important authority from the career managers who are most responsible for the day to day activities of government. Control through multitudes of regulations and procedures, administered by a central agency removed from service delivery, has created mangers with limited power but full responsibility for any problems that occur. Greater congruence between operating responsibility and managerial authority is absolutely necessary. . . .

A manager from the Internal Revenue Service said, "[W]e have a great need for new occupations. The existing classification system just does not serve our needs. For example, engineers for our computer systems--how

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