Misreading the Public: The Myth of a New Isolationism

By Steven Kull; I. M. Destler | Go to book overview

11 Why Doesn't Politics Close the Gap?

Previous chapters have presented a variety of specific explanations of why policy practitioners misread the public. They misinterpret dissatisfaction with the hegemonic role and a desire for more international burden sharing as a public wish to disengage. They misread the vocal public as the majority and fail to seek more comprehensive information about public opinion. They underestimate the public or assume that congressional action is a faithful reflection of citizens' preferences. We have already addressed these and other patterns of misreading the public.

But one large question remains: Why has the American political process allowed the gap between public attitudes and policy practitioners' perceptions of those attitudes to persist? Members of Congress are answerable to the electorate. So is the president. They have many means of divining constituent preferences. Why don't elections reward those who get it right and replace those who don't? And why doesn't the prospect of electoral defeat drive practitioners--members of Congress in particular, but also high-level executive branch officials--to close the gap? Of course, these practitioners would not in all cases conduct or advocate policies consistent with public preferences. But one might think that electoral pressure, together with the norms of representative democracy, would at least encourage them to get a reasonably accurate reading and learn whether

-229-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Misreading the Public: The Myth of a New Isolationism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • ABOUT BROOKINGS iv
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword 1
  • 1- The Puzzle 9
  • PART ONE The Gap 33
  • 2- America's Role In Today's, World 35
  • 3- The United Nations 59
  • 4- Un Peacekeeping 81
  • 5- Foreign Aid 113
  • 6- Defense Spending 134
  • PART TWO Challenging the Gap 151
  • 7- Letting Policy Practitioners Ask The Questions 153
  • 8- How the Public Makes Budgetary Trade-Offs 179
  • 9- Does Congress Mirror the Public? 193
  • PART THREE Explaining the Gap 205
  • 10- Why Do Policy Practitioners Misperceive the Public? 207
  • 11- Why Doesn't Politics Close the Gap? 229
  • 12- Putting the Puzzle Together 249
  • Appendix: Design of the Study 267
  • Notes 277
  • Index 303
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.