The Annotated Snark: The Full Text of Lewis Carroll's Great Nonsense Epic The Hunting of the Snark

By Lewis Carroll; Henry Holiday | Go to book overview

APPENDIX

The following commentary, by the pragmatist philosopher F. C. S. Schiller, originally appeared in Mind!, a parody issue of Mind, a British philosophical journal. The parody was published in 1901 as a special Christmas number and is believed to have been written almost entirely by Schiller. The year 1901 was a time when the great bugaboo of pragmatism was the Hegelian concept of the Absolute, a concept no longer fashionable in philosophic circles, though it continues to be smuggled into Protestant theology by German theologians with Hegelian pasts.

The frontispiece of Mind! is a "Portrait of Its Immanence the Absolute," printed on pink paper, to symbolize the pink of perfection, and protected by a tipped-in sheet of transparent tissue. The editors note the portrait's striking resemblance to the Bellman's map in The Hunting of the Snark. Beneath the absolutely blank pink portrait are instructions for use: "Turn the eye of faith, fondly but firmly on the center of the page, wink the other, and gaze fixedly until you see It."

It was this comic issue of Mind that provided Bertrand Russell with what he once insisted was the only instance he had ever encountered in which someone actually thought in a formal syllogism. A German philosopher had been much puzzled by the magazine's burlesque advertisements. Finally he reasoned: Everything in this magazine is a joke, the advertisements are in this magazine, therefore the advertisements must be jokes. Footnotes to the commentary are Schiller's except for those that I have added and initialed. -- M.G.


A COMMENTARY ON THE Snark

by Snarkophilus Snobbs [ F. C. S. SCHILLER]

It is a recognized maxim of literary ethics that none but the dead can deserve a commentary, seeing that they can no longer either explain themselves or perturb the explanations of those who devote themselves to the congenial, and frequently not unprofitable, task of making plain what was previously obscure, and profound what was previously plain. Hence it is easily understood that the demise of the late lamented Lewis Carroll has opened a superb field to the labors of the critical commentator, and

-96-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Annotated Snark: The Full Text of Lewis Carroll's Great Nonsense Epic The Hunting of the Snark
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Acknowledgments 4
  • Contents 9
  • Introduction 11
  • The Hunting of the Snark 27
  • Preface 33
  • The Hunting of the Snark - An Agony, in Eight Fits 35
  • Fit the First: - The Landing 37
  • Fit the Second: - The Bellman's Speech 47
  • Fit the Third: - The Baker's Tale 54
  • Fit the Fourth: - The Hunting 59
  • Fit the Fifth: - The Beaver's Lesson 65
  • Fit the Sixth: - The Barrister's Dream 75
  • Fit the Seventh: - The Banker's Fate 81
  • Fit the Eighth: - The Vanishing 85
  • Bibliography 91
  • Appendix 96
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 111

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.