Free Trade between Mexico and the United States?

By Sidney Weintraub | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
The Politics of U.S.-Mexican Trade Integration

INGRAINED habits of thinking, instilled from childhood, among Mexicans and Americans impede analysis of the economics of a movement toward free trade and would complicate conclusion of a bilateral agreement even if the economic considerations weighed in its favor.1 It is not possible to do justice in a brief discussion to the origins of these national differences, but neither can they be ignored in a serious analysis. Most of this book deals with economic issues, but economics as practiced between nations is also politics. This chapter examines the reciprocal political attitudes and concerns and their implications for a movement to free trade.

Disparate power and conflicting histories are obstacles to greater trade integration between Mexico and the United States. However, other countries with mutual antagonism and distrust have concluded trade and economic integration arrangements despite these or, in the case of Germany and France, because of them. Distrust may even remain as trade is freed, which is what happened with Ireland in relation to the United Kingdom and with the Netherlands in relation to Germany, when each country sought the benefits of membership in the European Community. The French need not love the Germans to cooperate with them economically. Despite a continuing territorial dispute, Peru and Ecuador cooperate in the Andean Group, and even a war between El Salvador and Honduras did not lead to the withdrawal of either from the Central American Common Market. Trade arrangements can transcend political tensions.

____________________
1
An excellent analysis of how these habits of thinking are instilled in Mexican children can be found in Rafael Segovia Canosa, La politización del niño mexicano.

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Free Trade between Mexico and the United States?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Author's Preface ix
  • Contents xiii
  • Contents xiv
  • Chapter One Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two The Politics of U.S.-Mexican Trade Integration 13
  • Chapter Three U.S.-Mexican Trade 33
  • Chapter Four Mexican Trade Policy 66
  • Chapter Five Mexico's Development Plans And Strategies 95
  • Chapter Six Implementing Free Trade 129
  • Chapter Seven Questioning the Divergence Theory 154
  • Chapter Eight Summary 172
  • Bibliography 187
  • Index 199
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 205

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.