Regions of Identity: The Construction of America in Women's Fiction, 1885-1914

By Kate McCullough | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Writing acknowledgments for this book has been a pleasure because it has given me a chance to reflect on just how thoroughly feminist community structures and nurtures my life. Many people have helped me over the years, providing support both intellectual and emotional. For financial support, leave time, and widespread institutional support I would like to thank Miami University and especially C. Barry Chabot. For helping me to think through issues at stake here, I thank my English 680 graduate seminar of Spring 1994, especially Nancy Dayton. Many friends and colleagues have read parts of this project over the years and provided me with perceptive and inspiring feedback; many have shared ideas and listened to me endlessly rehash my own. I would like to thank Alice Adams, Elizabeth Ammons, Mary Jean Corbett, Fran Dolan, Catherine Gallagher, Tom Foster, Anne Goldman, John Gruesser, Sandra Gunning, Karen Jacobs, Marcy J. Knopf, David Levin, Michael Moon, Susan Morgan, Fred Moten, Carolyn Porter, Laura Mandell, Nancy Nenno, Judith Rosen, Mary Ryan, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Jacqueline Shea-Murphy, Stephanie Smith, Victoria Smith, Theresa Tensuan, Françoise Verges, and Sandra Zagarell. I would also like to thank Stacey Lynn and Helen Tartar at Stanford University Press, as well as John Brewer for his fine copyediting.

Other friends have contributed to this project in more diffuse ways, feeding me both literally and figuratively, laughing with me, and sharing both pleasures and frustrations over the years. For combining heroic levels of both professional and personal support, I would especially like to thank Eva Cherniavsky, Jane Garrity, Laura Green, and Lori Merish. Thanks to my family, especially my mother, Louise Papanek McCullough, for various kinds of support, and thanks to Katie and Annie McCullough for being the wise and hilarious souls they are. I will always remember and be grateful to Craig Fawcett for being the first to suggest to me that I should write. I was lucky enough to work as an undergraduate with Roger Henkle, who has become my measure of a fine teacher and who provided me with endless encouragement and more than a few drinks over the course of my graduate school career. Thanks also to Maria Kahn for persistence, patience, and insight and to Rena Alex for showing me

-vii-

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