Telling Tales: The Hysteric's Seduction in Fiction and Theory

By Katherine Cummings | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In telling tales, I have profited from the input of many. Here, I especially want to thank Carolyn Allen for generously reading numerous drafts of the manuscript, prodding me to clarify my arguments and write more straightforward prose. Thanks also to Evan Watkins and Donna Gerstenberger for their continued encouragement and feedback on the book--to Evan, in particular, for asking difficult questions--to Sarah van den Berg for advice on organizing the discussion of Clarissa, and to Teri Stratton for arguing with me about Lacan. Betsy Draine, Eric Rothstein, and Elaine Marks supervised the dissertation that has ultimately become Telling Tales; Jane Gallop helped me to formulate my story of seduction in Freud. I also want to thank the readers of Stanford Press for their critical and political advice; their interventions have played a large part in the book's final shape. Finally, thanks to Helen Tartar for her sympathetic reading and advocacy, Ellen F. Smith for her outstanding copy- editing, and Robin Reid for proofreading. I also thank the Graduate School at the University of Washington for summer research grant support.

An earlier version of Chapter 3 was published in Style 21:2 ( 1987). The second interlude represents a slight reworking of an article that first appeared in Genders ( August 1990), which is published by the University of Texas Press.

For the most part, I have elected to quote from paperback editions in lieu of the Standard Edition of Freud's work because of their ready availability. A second consideration prompted my decision to use the Collier edition of The Early Psychoanalytic Writings. My aim in using the earlier translations of John Rickman and others was to come closer to the original German essays and thus to preserve

-vii-

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Telling Tales: The Hysteric's Seduction in Fiction and Theory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • A Note to the Reader xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One Seduction and Psychoanalysis 19
  • Epilogue 65
  • Interlude: "Between the Acts" 67
  • Chapter Two Clarissa's "Life with Father" 90
  • Interlude: A Spurious Set (Up) 157
  • Chapter Three Rereading Bleak House: the Chronicle Of A "Little Body" and Its Perverse Defense 191
  • Chapter Four Translation, Transference, and Other "Tender in the Night" 230
  • Epilogue 279
  • Reference Matter 281
  • Works Cited 283
  • Index 293
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