I Lived inside the Campus Revolution

By William Tulio Divale; James Joseph | Go to book overview

Introduction: Inside the Campus Revolution

THE blackest day in my twenty-eight years was Tuesday, June 17, 1969. Early that morning, on a downtown Los Angeles street, I met my FBI "handler"--one of several federal agents who had been my contacts during more than four years of campus turmoil and confrontation.

I was hustled into a car. In silence, we drove a circuitous route to Los Angeles' monolithic Federal Courthouse Building, parked in a secluded stall in its subterranean garage, and entered the building through a back door. Other agents were waiting. We took a freight elevator to the seventh floor--and walked, for security reasons, to the eighth. Quickly, I was ushered into a courtroom antechamber. On the other side of its massive oaken door the five-member Federal Subversive Activities Control Board (SACB) had, only moments before, opened two days of hearings. Once I stepped through that door and into the courtroom, I would be revealed--as an FBI student undercover informer.

" Wayne," my FBI handler said quietly, using my undercover name, "are you absolutely sure you want to go through with this?"

I nodded. I had made my decision. More exactly, time and circumstances had made it for me. Nonetheless, it had been made. I would testify.

My handler's concern--as both of us very well knew--was mere stage business in what, for the government's scenario writers and directors, has become a smash succession of sociocomedies. For want of a better name they are called "surfacings."

Their scripts have the look-alike sameness of Xerox copies. Their settings are likewise. The play is called to curtain by a sergeant-

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
I Lived inside the Campus Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction: Inside The Campus Revolution vii
  • I Lived Inside the Campus. Revolution xxix
  • 1. Making of a Fink 1
  • 2. Commitment to Communism 21
  • 3. the Black Rose Queen 47
  • 4. Eyewitness to Genocide 65
  • 5. the Demarcation 81
  • 6. Secret War for Sds 97
  • 7. the Politics of Confrontation 117
  • 8. Up from Revolution 131
  • 9. Breakup 143
  • 10. the Angela Davis Affair 163
  • 11. Days of Rage--And Roses 187
  • 12- Who's Who in Campus Activism 201
  • Index 245
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 253

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.