I Lived inside the Campus Revolution

By William Tulio Divale; James Joseph | Go to book overview

3. The Black Rose Queen

IF the Federal Bureau of Investigation knighted its campus finks, by the fall of 1965--as I started my final year at Pasadena City College --I'd have been on the Herald's List. And my FBI handlers might have been addressing me as "Sir William."

I had done yeoman duty. From a mere knave in the FBI student informer brigade only six months before, I'd risen to lead the charge. In fact, rather than simply being a chronicler of events, I was helping to shape them. I was chairman of the Central Los Angeles DuBois club, had just returned as a delegate from the first DuBois National Leadership Conference in Chicago, had graduated from Marxist school, and had been invited to join the Communist party. All the time I had been reporting to the Bureau not only on the Party, its DuBois clubs, and the student movement, but on myself.

". . . William Divale," my now-voluminous reports to the Bureau would chronicle (I am reading as I write this from several of them from that period), "suggested that DuBois members should participate actively in upcoming demonstrations in support of Cesar Chavez and his grape strikers."

". . . Club chairman Divale agreed with DuBois member Carol W. that just as soon as she can she should join the 'Los Angeles Committee to End the War in Vietnam.'"

". . . The turning point in U.S. participation in Vietnam-- enunciated by President Johnson in his speech of July 29, 1965, for the first time pledging the U.S. to an all but unlimited troop commitment--is bound to change the whole complexion of student protest, Divale told the meeting. Now a second great issue has been joined with that of Civil Rights--the war in Vietnam."

Four years later, when I took the witness stand before the Sub-

-47-

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I Lived inside the Campus Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction: Inside The Campus Revolution vii
  • I Lived Inside the Campus. Revolution xxix
  • 1. Making of a Fink 1
  • 2. Commitment to Communism 21
  • 3. the Black Rose Queen 47
  • 4. Eyewitness to Genocide 65
  • 5. the Demarcation 81
  • 6. Secret War for Sds 97
  • 7. the Politics of Confrontation 117
  • 8. Up from Revolution 131
  • 9. Breakup 143
  • 10. the Angela Davis Affair 163
  • 11. Days of Rage--And Roses 187
  • 12- Who's Who in Campus Activism 201
  • Index 245
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