I Lived inside the Campus Revolution

By William Tulio Divale; James Joseph | Go to book overview

5. The Demarcation

FALL, 1966, in many ways, was a clear-cut demarcation in my student and activist life. I graduated, so to speak, to the upper division in college, in politics, and under cover for the FBI.

That fall--shortly after my return from New York where I'd attended the Party's Lake Ellis Marxist school and also its eighteenth national convention--I transferred from Pasadena City College to the University of California's Los Angeles campus. Transferred, too, was my DuBois chairmanship.

I handed over leadership of the Central LA club and assumed leadership of UCLA's DuBois club, which I headed that fall. New, too, was my pad. Walter Crowe and Bill Shelby, who'd preceded me by a year to UCLA, suggested I join them. The three of us became roommates. We found an apartment on South Barrington Street in west Los Angeles, not far from the UCLA campus. I switched Party clubs, too, moving my membership to UCLA's Student Club which met off campus in various members' homes or apartments, including my own. At least our UCLA Party club didn't trifle with titles. It called itself a "student" club, which it was.

With the other Party clubs to which I belonged, we were always reorganizing, if only to change names. The Jose Martin Club had become the Eastside Club and then, facetiously (Party youth savor a pinch of humor with their Marx), we'd renamed it the "Workers and Peasants Club." In its entire membership there wasn't an honest-totoiling worker, much less a peasant.

I also acquired a new FBI handler-- Richard Bloiser. Fortyish but already balding, Dick had graduated from Ohio State and was one of the Bureau's photography specialists. He was also something of a

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I Lived inside the Campus Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction: Inside The Campus Revolution vii
  • I Lived Inside the Campus. Revolution xxix
  • 1. Making of a Fink 1
  • 2. Commitment to Communism 21
  • 3. the Black Rose Queen 47
  • 4. Eyewitness to Genocide 65
  • 5. the Demarcation 81
  • 6. Secret War for Sds 97
  • 7. the Politics of Confrontation 117
  • 8. Up from Revolution 131
  • 9. Breakup 143
  • 10. the Angela Davis Affair 163
  • 11. Days of Rage--And Roses 187
  • 12- Who's Who in Campus Activism 201
  • Index 245
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