I Lived inside the Campus Revolution

By William Tulio Divale; James Joseph | Go to book overview

7. The Politics of Confrontation

ONE word in the lexicon of campus activism captured the manner and.mood of the Movement in the fall of 1967. The word was "confrontation."

One Saturday in late October, thirty-five thousand marched on the Pentagon, burst through a cordon of troops and U.S. marshals, and briefly occupied a portion of the GHQ of U.S. military might. During that same "Stop the Draft Week," five thousand stormed the Oakland California, Induction Center. And on Boston Common, scores burnt their draft cards to the cheers of four thousand youthful protesters. Three weeks later they hit New York's Hilton Hotel to disrupt a dinner of the Foreign Policy Association and its principal speaker, Secretary of State Dean Rusk.

Of the Pentagon protest, in which more than four hundred were arrested--among them author Norman Mailer--and scores injured, one of the Movement's best-read "underground" newspapers declared:

It was a demonstration considered by many [in the Movement] to be an almost perfect example of the principle of active confrontation. . . .

Just as revealing was an incident in Oakland, California. There, as two thousand cops, outnumbered better than 2 to 1, flailed against waves of screaming protesters, a youthful leader of the confrontation took himself momentarily out of the action. Blood streaming from a billy-club gash in his forehead, he steadied himself in dazed euphoria. Blinking back blood, he scanned the scene triumphantly.

"Beautiful!" he exulted. "Simply beautiful!"

In the chemistry of confrontation, blood was an analeptic, sheer

-117-

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I Lived inside the Campus Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction: Inside The Campus Revolution vii
  • I Lived Inside the Campus. Revolution xxix
  • 1. Making of a Fink 1
  • 2. Commitment to Communism 21
  • 3. the Black Rose Queen 47
  • 4. Eyewitness to Genocide 65
  • 5. the Demarcation 81
  • 6. Secret War for Sds 97
  • 7. the Politics of Confrontation 117
  • 8. Up from Revolution 131
  • 9. Breakup 143
  • 10. the Angela Davis Affair 163
  • 11. Days of Rage--And Roses 187
  • 12- Who's Who in Campus Activism 201
  • Index 245
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