Implicit Memory and Metacognition

By Lynne M. Reder | Go to book overview

Chapter 10
Implicit Memory, Explicit Memory, and False Recollection: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective

Kenneth A. Norman Daniel L. Schacter Harvard University

Over the past decade, research exploring the relation between implicit and explicit forms of memory has generated an impressive array of new findings, theoretical perspectives, and procedures for investigating the effects of past experience on subsequent behavior (for reviews, see Graf & Masson, 1993; Richardson-Klavehn & Bjork, 1988; Roediger & McDermott, 1993; Schacter, 1987a; Schacter, Chiu, & Ochsner, 1993). Studies of implicit memory have also exposed gaps in our understanding of conscious, explicit recollection. One such gap involves the distinction between retrieving stored information, on the one hand, and the subjective experience of remembering, on the other. Logically, retrieval and remembering are not the same thing; the subjective experience of remembering, at its core, involves taking retrieved information and interpreting it as depicting or pertaining to some past experience. For years, however, the question of how retrieved information becomes a conscious memory was ignored by memory researchers, in large part because on tests of explicit memory (i.e., recall and recognition), retrieval and remembering are coextensive: By explicitly asking subjects to think back to the study phase, the experimenter is forging the link between present and past that, outside of the lab, subjects have to discover on their own (cf. Schacter & Tulving, 1982; Tulving, 1989).

Research on implicit memory has helped to revive interest in the relationship between memory and remembering, by demonstrating (in studies of college students, amnesic patients, elderly adults, young children, and

-229-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Implicit Memory and Metacognition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 362

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.