I Lived inside the Campus Revolution

By William Tulio Divale; James Joseph | Go to book overview

12. Who's Who in Campus Activism

WHO speaks for American youth?

The answer--as of now--is that no single activist group does. Yet each has set for its task the shaping of tomorrow's young voter--and some, who would take up arms rather than the ballot, of tomorrow's revolutionary.

Whether it will be voter or revolutionary, or something in between, each activist group is spurred by the certain knowledge that today's collegians (as well as those youths who do not enter college) will by their very numbers hold the power in a few years to change the political course and image of America. Bluntly, this is the impact of the activism now engulfing campus and ghetto, city and suburb, the main streets of America and its dingy back alleys.

The rivulet demand for change in the fifties has become a mighty river of protest in the seventies.

The question is not "Will there be change?" Rather, it is "What kind of change--evolutionary or revolutionary?"

In nearly every case the campus has become the focus for change, whether for little more than a restructuring of the status quo or for a revolutionary, even violent, revision of the American system.

That is why the roll call of campus activism I have gathered here deserves more than casual reading. In a relatively few paragraphs I have tried to call the roll of activism, group by group, and to explain where each has been, where each is today, and to provide some inkling as to where each may be going tomorrow.

The roster of campus activism, grown from a handful of campusactive groups in the sixties, has become a legion in the seventies. It spans the political and philosophical spectrum, from the radical right NYA (the newly formed National Youth Alliance which espouses

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I Lived inside the Campus Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction: Inside The Campus Revolution vii
  • I Lived Inside the Campus. Revolution xxix
  • 1. Making of a Fink 1
  • 2. Commitment to Communism 21
  • 3. the Black Rose Queen 47
  • 4. Eyewitness to Genocide 65
  • 5. the Demarcation 81
  • 6. Secret War for Sds 97
  • 7. the Politics of Confrontation 117
  • 8. Up from Revolution 131
  • 9. Breakup 143
  • 10. the Angela Davis Affair 163
  • 11. Days of Rage--And Roses 187
  • 12- Who's Who in Campus Activism 201
  • Index 245
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