The Anarchist Prince: A Biographical Study of Peter Kropotkin

By George Woodcock; Ivan Avakumović | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
THE TRAVELLER

WHEN Kropotkin left France in the early months of 1886, he had no intention of retiring into an insularity of attitude corresponding to the physical insularity he adopted for some years in England. While from the first days of his arrival he did his best, as always, to participate effectively in the progressive movements immediately around him, he never lost his cosmopolitan outlook. Allowing for certain distorting prejudices, he retained a sound understanding of world affairs, and contributed a not inconsiderable influence to international thought.

In the years immediately following his departure from the Continent, he kept in close touch with friends abroad. Before departing he had spent much time with Jean Grave, and had promised to send material regularly for Le Revolté. This he did, writing for each issue, even when the paper became a weekly in the early summer of 1886, and continuing for La Revolte, the new journal which followed the suppression of Le Revolté in September 1887. Almost the whole of The Conquest of Bread, as well as Anarchist Morality, appeared in serial form in these two papers, the various articles being reprinted as pamphlets before they were compiled into books.

It must be emphasised that the circulation of these works in France was not restricted to anarchists or even to the socialist movement as a whole. When The Conquest of Bread appeared in 1892, it was hailed by Zola as a "true poem", while the critic, Maurice Barre's, writing in Figaro during 1891, said that Kropotkin's pamphlets sprang from a "beautiful logic and a strong generosity". Apart from these elder writers very many of the young poets and critics were impressed by Kropotkin's

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The Anarchist Prince: A Biographical Study of Peter Kropotkin
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Contents 6
  • Chapter II - THE EXPLORER 49
  • Chapter IV - THE AGITATOR 145
  • Chapter V - "THE WHITE JESUS" 200
  • Chapter VI - THE TRAVELLER 266
  • Chapter VII - THE WRITER 305
  • Chapter VIII - THE EXILE 342
  • Chapter IX - THE NEGLECTED SAGE 388
  • Chapter X - THE PROPHET 438
  • Bibliography 455
  • Index 459
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