The New Liberalism: The Rising Power of Citizen Groups

By Jeffrey M. Berry | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOUR
The Power of Citizen Groups

THOUSANDS OF INTEREST groups compete for space on the congressional agenda. In alliances and by themselves, they try to convince legislators to take up their cause. Since groups vary so much in their available resources, the perceived importance of their issues, and the degree to which they face active opposition from other lobbies, it's very difficult to predict how and why some groups succeed in gaining a spot on a congressional committee calendar while others fail.

The dramatic rise in the proportion of postmaterial issues on the congressional agenda certainly suggests that the citizen groups that back these policies have been successful in persuading Congress to consider their proposals. Yet no direct evidence of citizen groups initiating the postmaterial issues has yet been offered. If citizen groups were significant in influencing the congressional agenda, we should be able to find some historical data to support this contention. Were citizen groups, in fact, responsible for pushing these postmaterial issues onto the agenda of the U.S. Congress?

The rise of postmaterialism also implies that business has lost some of its preeminence in the congressional process. There is good reason to be skeptical of any claim that business's political prowess has diminished. Business influence can be felt in ways that extend far beyond the bills that Congress considers and acts on. Still, citizen groups have challenged business and have created an increasingly competitive and complex legislative environment for corporations and trade groups. How has busi

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The New Liberalism: The Rising Power of Citizen Groups
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • ABOUT BROOKINGS iv
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter One Not Dead 1
  • Chapter Two The Rise Of Citizen Groups 16
  • Chapter Three The Rise Of Postmaterialism 34
  • Chapter Four The Power Of Citizen Groups 61
  • Chapter Five Liberals Ascendant 87
  • Chapter Six Rich in Resources 119
  • Chapter Seven Liberalism Transformed 153
  • Appendix A- Methodology 171
  • Appendix B- List of Cases 184
  • Notes 190
  • Index 209
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 220

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.