England under the Normans and Angevins, 1066-1272

By H. W. C. Davis | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
THE OLD ORDER AND THE NEW

THE favourite art of any age is the best clue to the spirit of the age; it is significant that architecture engrossed the artists of the Anglo-Norman period. Painting and sculpture, essentially imitative in their nature, depend for success upon a fine perception of nuance in colour, contour, and proportion. In this faculty the age was wanting; it was pleased with simple hues and the indefinite repetition of a simple pattern; it had not studied nature; it was more concerned with the soul than with the body. But in architecture the best minds found a satisfaction for some of their profoundest feelings; for their love of the mysterious and the massive; for their inveterate tendency to denote unseen realities by a concrete symbol; for the sense of brotherhood in an imperishable society; for the desire to testify their faith by some material contribution to the resources of the Church. So churches sprang up broadcast; cathedrals for the dioceses, minsters for conventual communities, chapels and parish churches for the poorest country manors. The architects expressed in stone and mortar what they conceived to be eternal truths. Incidentally and unconsciously they revealed the peculiarities of their own age and nationality. These buildings remain like the fossil skeletons from which geologists divine the features of an otherwise forgotten stage of life. From the churches alone we might infer the presence of a conquering race. Ground-plan and ornament alike carry the thoughts of the spectator beyond the Channel and across the Alps; the foreign influences are palpable; the breach with the past of English art is violent and sudden; the absence of a transitional stage denotes that we are dealing with an importation, not with a natural development. At the same time the new architects, though im

Anglo- Norman Archi--

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
England under the Normans and Angevins, 1066-1272
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 620

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.