England under the Normans and Angevins, 1066-1272

By H. W. C. Davis | Go to book overview

intention of either visiting Gascony in person or sending thither his eldest son, the Lord Edward. In the midst of his campaign the Earl received a command to lay down his arms and surrender his command. It was in vain that he protested, appealing to the terms on which he had been appointed.1 The utmost which he could obtain was the repayment of his expenses and an additional sum of 7,000 marks. He left Gascony in high indignation and retired to France, which he found in great confusion owing to the King's absence and the death of the Queen-mother Blanche. The barons of France paid him the highest compliment in their power by offering to make him their seneschal and regent. But he was unwilling to cut himself adrift from England. In 1253 when Henry came to Gascony, and realised at length the true state of affairs, he pressed the Earl to return and give assistance in meeting difficulties which were too great for any other man. Simon reluctantly obeyed this appeal to his allegiance; he returned and for a short while remained with the royal army.2 But it was no longer possible that he should work with the King. Contempt on the one side, suspicion on the other, formed insuperable barriers between them. At the beginning of 1254 the Earl returned to England leaving the King behind in Gascony.

De Montfort Superseded

____________________
1
Bémont, pp. 322, 343.
2
Ibid., p. 338. Chron. Maj., v., 366, 383, 396.

-442-

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