PART I
FROM THE BEGINNING OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY

Chapter One
First European Visitors

IT is difficult to imagine how recent are the present neat divisions of southern Africa, the provinces and districts, the static tribal boundaries. Until the European came to freeze all movement into immobility, it was a country of migrations. The tribal groups moved at will according to their inclination and ability. Sometimes they would pause, perhaps for generations, in some particularly fertile or well- watered spot until some stronger group came to drive them out and take possession of the land. Or else, rent by internal dissension, the tribe would split into smaller groups, each one hiving off under a leader (as did the Ngwato and the Ngwaketse from the Kwena) to seek an independent life of its own in a new land. Where Masilo, and Malope, legendary founders of the primary Tswana tribes, may have lived is unknown. But it seems certain that at the time of the Bantu migrations into southern Africa, a group of people called Sotho, allied by ties of language and by similarities in social organization, penetrated as far as the Vaal River and beyond, and spread from the Kalahari to what is now the Eastern Transvaal, forming a belt across that part of southern Africa. It is to this group that the Tswana belong, as well as the people of modern Basutoland and many smaller tribes.

The pioneers were the ancestors of the people now called Kgalagadi, who settled in what is now the Protectorate after expelling or absorbing the still earlier Bushmen. Next came the ancestors of the Rolong and of their offshoots, such as the Tlhaping and the Kaa. Finally, as part of the last and greatest wave of Sotho migration, perhaps in the fifteenth or sixteenth century, came the people who later split up into the other Tswana tribes we know to-day.

Like that of most African peoples, the early history of the Tswana is shrouded in legend, and the historian can only grope his way amongst folklore and tradition until he comes to some date recorded by Europeans. Serious history can go no further back than the beginning of the nineteenth century, though later in this book (Part II) I shall sketch the history of each tribe as recorded by tradition.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Bechuanaland Protectorate
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 238

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.