Chapter Eight
The Jameson Raid. Demarcation of Boundaries. The Tati Area

THE tragi-comedy of the Jameson Raid has a close connexion with the Protectorate. Much has been written about its causes, the responsibility of the various protagonists and the consequences of the Raid on racial relations in Africa.1 Such exhaustive analysis has no place here. But since it was in the Protectorate that the Raid was prepared, and since the Protectorate was the base from which it started, and since its failure was to have considerable influence on Protectorate history, Dr. Jameson's rash enterprise must receive something more than passing mention.

The idea had roots in the dissatisfaction of the 'Uitlanders' of Johannesburg, those enterprising immigrants who came in to develop the minerals of the Rand, with the treatment accorded to them by the Transvaal Government under President Kruger. This Government, composed of Boers, religious-minded farmers, had little sympathy with the life of the inhabitants of the towns, though not at all averse to taking revenue from the new industries. Finally the 'Uitlanders' became so embittered that they formed a revolutionary movement with the aim of wresting power from the Government. At the same time it was decided to provide help from outside in order to make the revolt a success. To both aspects of the 'putsch', Rhodes, then Premier of the Cape Colony, was sympathetic. With Beit, he supplied financial aid to arm the conspirators in Johannesburg, and he gave full support, and indeed inspiration, to the preparations for outside intervention. The raiding party was to be assembled within striking distance of Johannesburg under Sir. J. Willoughby and Jameson, who had just been appointed Resident Commissioner of the recently ceded territories of chiefs Ikaneng and Montshiwa. And indeed this cession was most opportune for it provided the raiders with a base on the borders of the Transvaal. A no less happy circumstance was the absorption of British Bechuanaland into the Cape Colony: this brought the important centre of Mafeking into the Colony. And if any further omens of success were needed, the Imperial Government decided at that moment to reduce the Bechuanaland Border Police, and the Company engaged itself to take over any men thus discharged. Sir Hercules Robinson, at Rhodes's request, arranged for practically the whole Force to assemble at Mafeking, where Dr. Jameson would

____________________
1
Readers are advised to consult the Cambridge History, Vol. VIII, pp. 552-67.

-77-

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