Censors in the Classroom: The Mind Benders

By Edward B. Jenkinson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

To complete a book on a controversial subject like censorship, a writer needs constant encouragement and support from friends and relatives. I received both from my family -- to whom this book is dedicated -- and from James Simmons, Assistant Directorand Editor of the Southern Illinois University Press, who suggested that I write this book and who gently persuaded me to keep returning to the research and to the typewriter until the manuscript was completed.

Any person who writes about current censorship activity in the schools discovers that the task would be extremely difficult if it were not for the Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom of the American Library Association. Grateful acknowledgment is given to Judith F. Krug and Roger L. Funk, Director and Assistant Director, respectively, of the Office for Intellectual Freedom of the ALA, for their Newsletter, their help, and their encouragement.

The following people sent me newspaper clippings, copies of articles and/or legal briefs, firsthand accounts of censorship activities, and/or hundreds of words of support: Theodora Baer, Bellevue, Washington; Teresa Burnau, Warsaw, Indiana; JoAnn DuPont, Warsaw, Indiana; Edmund Farrell, University of Texas at Austin; Donald Grove, Volga, Iowa; Dale Harris, Indiana State Teachers Association; Susan Heath, Nicolet College and Technical Institute, Rhinelander, Wisconsin; Robert Spencer Johnson, Glen Cove, New York; Leanne Katz, National Coalition Against Censorship; John Maxwell, National Council of Teachers of English; Donald Messimer, Mifflinburg, Pennsylvania; Thomas Nenneman, Omaha, Nebraska; Robert O'Neil, Indiana University, Bloomington; Charles Park, University of Wisconsin at Whitewater; Everett S. Porter, North

-vii-

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