A Long Shadow: Jefferson Davis and the Final Days of the Confederacy

By Michael B. Ballard | Go to book overview

THREE

We'll Fight It Out to the Mississippi River

IN THE PRESIDENTIAL CAR "silence reigned over the fugitives" as the train carrying the Confederate government crawled slowly toward Danville. Stephen Mallory described his colleagues. John Reagan was "silent and somber, his eyes as bright and glistening as beads, but evidently seeing nothing around them." He "sat chewing and ruminating in evident perplexity" as he whittled on a stick. George Trenholm, suffering from neuralgia, worried over the Treasury, "a very troublesome elephant," while his wife tried to comfort him. The irrepressible Judah Benjamin interrupted the quiet with hopeful talk of "other great national causes which had been redeemed from far gloomier circumstances." President Davis's staff members John Taylor Wood and William Preston Johnston sat silent, but Francis Lubbock recounted an endless supply of Texas stories in "a style earnest and demonstrative." Mallory himself reflected on his naval vessels, already in flames on the James River. 1

Jefferson Davis displayed a mixture of emotions. Crowds waited at all the stops, and everyone wanted to see, speak to, and shake hands with the president. He maintained a "bold front" and spoke encouragingly to seas of anxious faces. At one stop during the morning hours of 3 April a waiting crowd

-52-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Long Shadow: Jefferson Davis and the Final Days of the Confederacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • One - The Old Story of the Sick Lion 3
  • Two - The Scream and Rumble of the Cars 34
  • Three - We'll Fight It Out to the Mississippi River 52
  • Four - Much Depended on These Generals 74
  • Five - Unseated but not Unthroned 93
  • Six - Walking in a Dream 117
  • Seven - Old Enmities Were Forgotten 149
  • Bibliography 178
  • Index 195
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 200

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.