A Long Shadow: Jefferson Davis and the Final Days of the Confederacy

By Michael B. Ballard | Go to book overview

SIX

Walking in a Dream

BASIL DUKE GREW FRUSTRATED at the slow pace of the government column that snaked into South Carolina. One of his officers reminded him that at least the leisurely gait gave the impression that Jefferson Davis was "travelling like a president and not like a fugitive." Francis Lubbock had promised the president that when the government arrived in Lubbock's native South Carolina, there would be no more cool receptions, and indeed, in this region largely untouched by war, the fugitives did notice a much friendlier atmosphere. The first night out of Charlotte was spent in the town of Fort Mill, a few miles from the Catawba River. Davis, his staff, and most of the cabinet, stayed in the A. B. Springs home a few miles north of town. Teamsters parked the wagon train in a "nice clover lot" and enjoyed a dry night under the stars. 1

George Trenholm and his wife went on to Fort Mill and roomed in the home of William E. White. Trenholm's condition worsened during the night, and the next morning he wrote out his resignation. In the brief note, Trenholm thanked Jefferson Davis for his "kindness and courtesy." In accepting the resignation, the president wrote candidly, "You may have forgotten that I warned you when you were about to take office that our wants so far exceeded our means that you could not expect entire success and should anticipate censure and perhaps the loss of financial reputation." From Fort Mill, Trenholm and his wife traveled first to Chester and eventually

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A Long Shadow: Jefferson Davis and the Final Days of the Confederacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • One - The Old Story of the Sick Lion 3
  • Two - The Scream and Rumble of the Cars 34
  • Three - We'll Fight It Out to the Mississippi River 52
  • Four - Much Depended on These Generals 74
  • Five - Unseated but not Unthroned 93
  • Six - Walking in a Dream 117
  • Seven - Old Enmities Were Forgotten 149
  • Bibliography 178
  • Index 195
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