PREFACE

PERHAPS a few words are needed about the present collection and how it has been brought together and presented. It was begun in 1915, at the Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn, Alabama. During the two years of my teaching at the Alabama Polytechnic Institute I collected some songs directly from Negro singers, but the bulk of my songs came from students who had learned them from the Negroes. I added a number, both then and later, from my own recollection. I am indebted also to the manuscripts and memories of a number of my friends, white and colored. My colleague at Alabama Polytechnic, Professor C. C. Certain, gave me an interesting collection of gang work songs, and Mr. and Mrs. J. J. W. Harriss, of Greensboro, North Carolina, enlivened a Christmas vacation for me with songs of an older generation in North Carolina. Among my colored friends I am most indebted to Ed Lloyd, janitor of the apartment house in which I live. With Ed I have swapped songs (the only infallible method of collection) during many a golden afternoon when Ed was supposed to be washing windows or cleaning floors for my wife, and I was supposed to be attending to grave professorial duties. Ed refers to this book, justly, as "our book."

When I left Alabama in 1917, I had collected perhaps one half of the songs in my collection. For the next two years, in Cambridge, Saint Louis, and Maine, my major interests were elsewhere and I added to my collection only sporadically. In 1919 and 1920, however, I collected a considerable number of songs through my students at Trinity College, now Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. The original manuscripts of my Auburn and Trinity collections, together with typed copies, were presented to the Widener Library through Professor Kittredge, who had them bound for preservation. From 1920 to 1927 I have added a few songs to the collection from various sources.

All of the songs were given to me either in manuscript or by word of mouth. In each case I have consistently stressed the point, particularly with students, that I wanted no materials from printed

-xxi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Negro Folk-Songs
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Foreword v
  • Preface xxi
  • Contents xxv
  • I The Negro Song in General 3
  • II Religious Songs 31
  • III Upstart Crows -- The Reaction From Religion 130
  • IV Social Songs -- Dance and Banjo 148
  • V Social Songs: Narrative Songs and Ballads 185
  • VI Songs About Animals 224
  • VII Work Songs--Gang Laborers 250
  • VIII Rural Labor 281
  • IX General and Miscellaneous Labor 290
  • X Songs About Women 311
  • XI Recent Events 341
  • XII The Seamier Side 356
  • XIII Race-Consciousness 376
  • XIV Blues and Miscellaneous Songs 387
  • APPENDICES 403
  • Bibliography 467
  • INDICES 481
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 501

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.