Democratic Theory and Technological Society

By Richard B. Day; Ronald Beiner et al. | Go to book overview

NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS
Edward Andrew teaches political philosophy at the University of Toronto. His publications include Closing the Iron Cage: The Scientific Management of Leisure ( 1981) and Shylock's Rights: A Grammar of Lockian Claims ( 1988).
Ronald Beiner is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He has edited Hannah Arendt Lectures on Kant's Political Philosophy ( 1982) and is the author of Political Judgment ( 1983).
Barry Cooper is Professor of Political Science at the University of Calgary. He is the author of books on Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Michel Foucault, Eric Voegelin and Alexander Kennedy Isbister. In addition, he has written The End of History and recently completed a book on technology and tyranny.
Richard B. Day is Professor of Political Economy at the Erindale Campus of the University of Toronto. His publications include Leon Trotsky and the Politics of Economic Isolation ( 1973); The 'Crisis' and the 'Crash': Soviet Studies of the West, 1917-1939 ( 1981); N. I. Bukharin, Selected Writings on the State and the Transition to Socialism ( 1983); E. A. Preobrazhensky, The Decline of Capitalism ( 1985) - the latter two edited and translated by R. B. Day with introductions and notes.
Marie Fleming is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Western Ontario. She is the author of The Anarchist Way to Socialism: Elisée Reclus and Nineteenth-Century European Anarchism and is currently working on a book entitled Force and Consent: Deconstructive Readings of Habermas' Theory of Communicative Action.
H. D. Forbes is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Nationalism, Ethnocentrism and Personality: Social Science and Critical Theory ( 1985) and editor of Canadian Political Thought ( 1985).
Frank Harrison is Professor of Political Science at St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia. He is the author of The Modern State: An Anarchist Analysis ( 1983) and is editor of Michael Bakunin Statism and Anarchy, published in English in 1976.
László G. Jobbágy taught political science at Karl Marx University of Economics in Budapest from 1976 to 1981 and is currently completing a Ph.D. thesis on "The Concept of Market in Socialist Thinking."

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