Imperialism and Social Reform: English Social-Imperial Thought, 1895-1914

By Bernard Semmel | Go to book overview

I
SOCIAL-IMPERIALISM

When the extra-group struggle with inferior races abroad has run to its end; then, if not sooner, the population question will force on a severer struggle for existence between civilized communities at home. Whether this struggle takes the form of actual warfare, or of still keener competition for trade and food-supply, that group in which unchecked internal competition has produced a vast proletariat with no limit of endurance, or with--to use a cant phrase--no 'stake in the State,' will be the first to collapse. It is extra-group competition which will more and more force the nations of Europe in the direction of socialism. . . .

KARL PEARSON in Socialism and Natural Selection, 1894

'Social-Imperialism' is a term used by a number of scholars during recent years. One of them, Franz Neumann, described it as an attempt on the part of the governing classes to provide a mass base for imperialism, an attempt 'to incorporate the working classes into an imperialistic system.' 'Concessions to the masses,' such as 'the extension of the franchise or material benefits,' Neumann explained, 'were employed to secure popular support for aggressive expansion.'1 The economist J. A. Schumpeter, in a famous essay written in 1919, defined social- imperialism as an imperialism in which 'entrepreneurs and other elements woo the workers by means of social welfare concessions which appear to depend on the success of export monopolism.' Social-imperialism, Schumpeter continued, was an attempt to revive the people's imperialisms of ancient times, to create a warrior nation modelled after the ancient Assyrians or the Arabs of the early middle ages.2 Both Schumpeter and Neumann asserted that such a 'people's imperialism' was an impossibility in the modern world; they insisted that it would be resisted by the industrial working class. Both, however,

____________________
1
Franz Neumann, Behemoth: The Structures and Practice of National Socialism ( London: Gollancz, 1944), pp. 153-5.
2
Joseph A. Schumpeter, Imperialism and Social Classes ( Oxford: Blackwell, 1951), f.n. pp. 114-115, and passim.

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Imperialism and Social Reform: English Social-Imperial Thought, 1895-1914
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 290

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.