Biographical Sketches of Eminent American Statesmen, with Speeches, Addresses and Letters

By B. F. Perry | Go to book overview

In the amendments proposed to the Constitution by the first Congress, Mr. Tucker, of South Carolina, proposed to add the right of the people to instruct their representatives in Congress. Judge Sherman opposed this amendment. "If the members were to be guided by instructions," said Judge Sherman, "there would be no use in deliberation; all that a member would have to do would be to produce his instructions, and lay them on the table and let them speak for him!" His constituents might instruct him to vote for an unconstitutional law, in violation of his oath to support the Constitution. Instead of a representative Republic, we should have a pure Democracy.

In 1792, on tile resignation of Senator Johnson, of Connecticut, Judge Sherman was elected a member of the United States Senate. He served two sessions in the Senate and died July 23, 1893. It is truthfully said of him, "His services to the country were invaluable, and few of his contemporaries left their impress more clearly upon American institutions." Like Franklin, Jackson, Greene and Washington, he was one of nature's noblemen. Though born in humble poverty, and apprenticed to a shoemaker, the nobility of his nature and his great intellectual endowments could not be suppressed and concealed from the world.

I believe General Sherman, the great Incendiary of the South, claims his descent from or kinship with this great and good man. After many crosses, the Sherman blood of 1776 may run very thin in the veins of the General. Roger Sherman was a man of a great deal of dry humor and wit. In the old Continental Congress a member said he detested the English so much that he wished the Americans to speak a different language, and praised the Greek as the most beautiful of all languages. Mr. Sherman said he was too old to begin to learn Greek, and hoped the member would make the English speak that language and leave their vernacular tongue for the use of the Americans only.

-495-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Biographical Sketches of Eminent American Statesmen, with Speeches, Addresses and Letters
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • P R E F a C E. v
  • Introduction vii
  • An Outline Of Governor Perry's Life. 1
  • Editorial Comments. 13
  • Action of The House of Representatives Of South Carolina. 19
  • Proceedings Of The Greenville Bar. 27
  • Proceedings in The Court of Common Pleas. Greenville, April 6th, 1887. 37
  • Fourth of July Oration. 47
  • An Address 65
  • Address - Delivered Before the Literary Societies of Erskine College, Abbeville District, S. C., on the Fifth Anniversary, Sept. 18, 1844 85
  • Speech 111
  • Speech of B. F. Perry, Of South Carolina. 145
  • Address - To the Democracy of the Fifth Congressional District in South Carolina, May 28, 1860. 153
  • Disunion. 171
  • The National Democratic Convention in Charleston, 1860. 186
  • United States Senator. 190
  • National Restoration. 191
  • Editorials - Approving of the Nomination of Governor Perry for Congress. 204
  • The Ancients and the Moderns. - A Comparison 217
  • Sketches Of Eminent American Statemen. 243
  • John Adams. 248
  • John Rutledge. 254
  • William H. 270
  • Patrick Henry. 279
  • Alexander Hamilton. 289
  • Benjamin Franklin. 308
  • William Pinkney. 329
  • Thomas Jefferson. 339
  • James Madison. 350
  • John Randolph. 382
  • John Jay. 393
  • Oliver Ellsworth. 403
  • William Smith. 410
  • Henry Laurens. 420
  • Gouverneur Morris. 428
  • William Henry Drayton. 441
  • Charles Pickney. 447
  • Arthur Middleton. 454
  • Pierce Butler. 459
  • Theophilus Parsons. 478
  • David Ramsay. 496
  • Fisher Ames. 518
  • Felix Grundy. 546
  • Edward Livingston. 555
  • Wade Hampton. 564
  • Thomas Sumter. 570
  • Colonel Benjamin Cleveland. 577
  • Colonel Benjamin Roebuck. 592
  • Letter from Dr. F. Peyre Porcher. 599
  • Letter from James P. Adams. 600
  • Letter from Col. Joseph N. Brown, an Ex-Confederate Colonel. 601
  • Extract from a Letter Written by a Gentle Man in Charleston to Gov. Perry. 602
  • Monument to Governor Perry. 608
  • Index. 611
  • Errata. 613
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 619

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.