Biographical Sketches of Eminent American Statesmen, with Speeches, Addresses and Letters

By B. F. Perry | Go to book overview

Felix was the seventh son of his father and mother, and at that time there was a superstition amongst the ignorant and uneducated that the seventh son was born to be a doctor, and in obedience to this superstition his mother intended to educate him for the practice of medicine. There was an academy at Bardstown of high reputation, under the direction of Dr. Priestly, afterwards President of the Nashville University. To this school his widowed mother sent him although she was hardly able to bear the expense; but her love for her youngest and favorite son, and his fondness for reading and study, determined her to make any sacrifice in order to give him a good education. At this academy he displayed wonderful talents and aptness for learning. He and his classmate, Judge Bascom, commenced in the lowest class in school and soon passed ahead of all the classes in the academy. Some of the students had been there a year or two. Their application was so intense that their teacher became alarmed for the health of his two favorite and most promising pupils and advised them to relax in their studies and take more exercise.

Whilst at this Academy young Felix displayed such extraordinary talent for public speaking, and was so passionately fond of it, that he no longer thought of his mother's wish that her seventh son should be a doctor. He determined to become a lawyer and cultivate his talent for public speaking. Consequently he commenced the study of law under the direction of Colonel George Nicholas, a man of great eminence, and at that time standing at the head of the Kentucky bar. He was fortunate in gaining the good opinion of this distinguished gentleman, who remained attached to him as long as he lived. Mr. Grundy never forgot, and often repeated in after life the good advice of this excellent gentleman and patriotic statesman. When Grundy first entered public life, at a very early age, Nicholas sent for him and said: "You have now commenced, Mr. Grundy, political life, be honest in all your purposes, and never

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Biographical Sketches of Eminent American Statesmen, with Speeches, Addresses and Letters
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • P R E F a C E. v
  • Introduction vii
  • An Outline Of Governor Perry's Life. 1
  • Editorial Comments. 13
  • Action of The House of Representatives Of South Carolina. 19
  • Proceedings Of The Greenville Bar. 27
  • Proceedings in The Court of Common Pleas. Greenville, April 6th, 1887. 37
  • Fourth of July Oration. 47
  • An Address 65
  • Address - Delivered Before the Literary Societies of Erskine College, Abbeville District, S. C., on the Fifth Anniversary, Sept. 18, 1844 85
  • Speech 111
  • Speech of B. F. Perry, Of South Carolina. 145
  • Address - To the Democracy of the Fifth Congressional District in South Carolina, May 28, 1860. 153
  • Disunion. 171
  • The National Democratic Convention in Charleston, 1860. 186
  • United States Senator. 190
  • National Restoration. 191
  • Editorials - Approving of the Nomination of Governor Perry for Congress. 204
  • The Ancients and the Moderns. - A Comparison 217
  • Sketches Of Eminent American Statemen. 243
  • John Adams. 248
  • John Rutledge. 254
  • William H. 270
  • Patrick Henry. 279
  • Alexander Hamilton. 289
  • Benjamin Franklin. 308
  • William Pinkney. 329
  • Thomas Jefferson. 339
  • James Madison. 350
  • John Randolph. 382
  • John Jay. 393
  • Oliver Ellsworth. 403
  • William Smith. 410
  • Henry Laurens. 420
  • Gouverneur Morris. 428
  • William Henry Drayton. 441
  • Charles Pickney. 447
  • Arthur Middleton. 454
  • Pierce Butler. 459
  • Theophilus Parsons. 478
  • David Ramsay. 496
  • Fisher Ames. 518
  • Felix Grundy. 546
  • Edward Livingston. 555
  • Wade Hampton. 564
  • Thomas Sumter. 570
  • Colonel Benjamin Cleveland. 577
  • Colonel Benjamin Roebuck. 592
  • Letter from Dr. F. Peyre Porcher. 599
  • Letter from James P. Adams. 600
  • Letter from Col. Joseph N. Brown, an Ex-Confederate Colonel. 601
  • Extract from a Letter Written by a Gentle Man in Charleston to Gov. Perry. 602
  • Monument to Governor Perry. 608
  • Index. 611
  • Errata. 613
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