Biographical Sketches of Eminent American Statesmen, with Speeches, Addresses and Letters

By B. F. Perry | Go to book overview

WADE HAMPTON.

There were very few officers in either the Federal or the Confederate army who acquired a higher distinction in the late unfortunate war for gallantry, heroism and skill than General Wade Hampton. No one had more entirely the confidence of his command in battle, or was more loved and admired by his troops in camp. This popularity has followed him home in peace, and he is now the idol of his old soldiers and the admiration of those brave men against whom he fought in so many bloody fields of battle. There was no one, in the recent Democratic Convention in New York, a greater lion with Northern delegates than General Hampton. Whenever he rose in that body, and his name was announced, he was greeted with shouts of applause. Well may he be entitled, from his high and pure character, to be styled the Bayard of the South. He was the Achilles Murat of the cavalry.

General Hampton was the son of Colonel Wade Hampton, one of General Jackson's aides-de-camp in the battle of New Orleans, and the grandson of General Wade Hampton of the Revolutionary army. In three successive wars these three generations of Hamptons have been conspicuous for their bold and daring gallantry. They were all South Carolinians, and the largest planters in the Southern States. The greatgrandfather of the present General Wade Hampton moved from North Carolina and settled in Spartanburg district previous to the American Revolution, and he and his wife, one son and a grandson were all massacred by the Indians at the breaking out of the war, in their own house! Another son was murdered by the Tories, whilst seated at the table with his family, eating their

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Biographical Sketches of Eminent American Statesmen, with Speeches, Addresses and Letters
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • P R E F a C E. v
  • Introduction vii
  • An Outline Of Governor Perry's Life. 1
  • Editorial Comments. 13
  • Action of The House of Representatives Of South Carolina. 19
  • Proceedings Of The Greenville Bar. 27
  • Proceedings in The Court of Common Pleas. Greenville, April 6th, 1887. 37
  • Fourth of July Oration. 47
  • An Address 65
  • Address - Delivered Before the Literary Societies of Erskine College, Abbeville District, S. C., on the Fifth Anniversary, Sept. 18, 1844 85
  • Speech 111
  • Speech of B. F. Perry, Of South Carolina. 145
  • Address - To the Democracy of the Fifth Congressional District in South Carolina, May 28, 1860. 153
  • Disunion. 171
  • The National Democratic Convention in Charleston, 1860. 186
  • United States Senator. 190
  • National Restoration. 191
  • Editorials - Approving of the Nomination of Governor Perry for Congress. 204
  • The Ancients and the Moderns. - A Comparison 217
  • Sketches Of Eminent American Statemen. 243
  • John Adams. 248
  • John Rutledge. 254
  • William H. 270
  • Patrick Henry. 279
  • Alexander Hamilton. 289
  • Benjamin Franklin. 308
  • William Pinkney. 329
  • Thomas Jefferson. 339
  • James Madison. 350
  • John Randolph. 382
  • John Jay. 393
  • Oliver Ellsworth. 403
  • William Smith. 410
  • Henry Laurens. 420
  • Gouverneur Morris. 428
  • William Henry Drayton. 441
  • Charles Pickney. 447
  • Arthur Middleton. 454
  • Pierce Butler. 459
  • Theophilus Parsons. 478
  • David Ramsay. 496
  • Fisher Ames. 518
  • Felix Grundy. 546
  • Edward Livingston. 555
  • Wade Hampton. 564
  • Thomas Sumter. 570
  • Colonel Benjamin Cleveland. 577
  • Colonel Benjamin Roebuck. 592
  • Letter from Dr. F. Peyre Porcher. 599
  • Letter from James P. Adams. 600
  • Letter from Col. Joseph N. Brown, an Ex-Confederate Colonel. 601
  • Extract from a Letter Written by a Gentle Man in Charleston to Gov. Perry. 602
  • Monument to Governor Perry. 608
  • Index. 611
  • Errata. 613
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