The Art of the Renaissance in Northern Europe: Its Relation to the Contemporary Spiritual and Intellectual Movements

By Otto Benesch | Go to book overview

III The New Attitude toward Nature

The Discoverers of Landscape in Painting and Science

ON OPENING the shrine of the Isenheim Altar, we see on the left wing the scene of the visit of St. Anthony to St. Paul, the hermit in the wilderness depicted by Grünewald. Here the art of the master reaches its climax. Evening spreads over the valley, in which trees of the German forest are interspersed with exotic palms. It is an aboriginal, a magic landscape, which looks as if the waters of the deluge had just receded. Rocks darken in deep, velvety brown; stems rise, gray like the bodies of scaly animals; black mosses drip from the branches. Deer cross the wilderness with soundless step, merging with the dusk. Misty hues float through a mysterious glen in the background, where beyond a dark river the silent majesty of the blue, high forest rises. It is overtowered by mountain peaks whose aerial shapes catch the last evening light and softly glow in a most tender rose. The whole color symphony is unified as in a painting by Titian.

This extraordinary feeling of nature does not appear for the first time in German painting with Grünewald. In a painting (Fig. 21) done some years earlier, in 1511 (actually a sheet of vellum mounted on wood), there is represented the meeting of St. George with the dragon. It is difficult to distinguish the figure of the Saint in his plumed helmet from the thicket of the high forest. The overwhelming richness of uncouth nature fills the little panel. Tall beeches form a tight network with the undergrowth; one form is interlaced with the other. The forest as a unit is supposed to enter the picture space. Although we see only a part of it, its unlimited extension in height and depth is suggested. A soft breeze seems to move the branches, so that the high lights of the leaves glitter. The forest is the main content of the picture,

-41-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Art of the Renaissance in Northern Europe: Its Relation to the Contemporary Spiritual and Intellectual Movements
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 174

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.