The Lying Valet: A Peep behind the Curtain; Or, the New Rehearsal. Bon Ton; Or, High Life above Stairs

By David Garrick; Louise Brown Osborn | Go to book overview

PROLOGUE.

BOLD is the man, and compos mentis, scarce-- Who, in these nicer times, dares write a Farce; A vulgar long-forgotten taste renew; All now are Comedies, five acts, or two. Authors have ever in a canting strain, Begg'd mercy for the bantling of their brain: That you, kind nurse, wou'd fondle 't on your lap, And rear it with applause, that best of pap-- Thus babes have in their cradles 'scap'd a blow, Tho' lame and rickety from top to toe: Our bard, with prologue-outworks has not fenc'd him, For all that I shall say, will make against him. Imprimis, this his piece--a Farce we call it-- Ergo, 'tis low--and ten to one you maul it! Wou'd you, because 'tis low, no quarter give? Black-guards, as well as Gentlemen, should live. 'Tis downright English too--nothing from France; Except some beasts, which treat you with a dance. With a Burletta too we shall present you-- And, not Italian--that will discontent you. Nay, what is worse--you'll see it, and must know it-- I, Thomas King, of King--street, am the poet: The murder's out--the murderer detected; May in one night, be tried, condemn'd, dissected. 'Tis said, for Scandal's tongue will never cease; That mischief's meant against our little piece: Let me look round, I'll tell you how the case is-- There's not one frown a single brow disgraces; I never saw a sweeter set of faces!

-51-

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The Lying Valet: A Peep behind the Curtain; Or, the New Rehearsal. Bon Ton; Or, High Life above Stairs
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • ILLUSTRATIONS vii
  • Introduction ix
  • The Lying Valet. 1
  • SCENE II. MELISSA'S Lodgings. 13
  • ACT II. 22
  • EPILOGUE, 44
  • A Peep Behind the Curtain; Or, The New Rehearsal. 47
  • PROLOGUE. 51
  • A PEEP BEHIND THE CURTAIN; OR, The New Rehearsal. 53
  • SCENE II. The Playhouse. 56
  • ACT II. The Stage. 74
  • Bon Ton; Or, High Life Above Stairs. 91
  • PROLOGUE, Written by GEORGE COLMAN. Spoken by Mr. KING. 95
  • ACT I. 99
  • SCENE III Lady Minikin's Apartments. 118
  • ACT II. 122
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