The Lying Valet: A Peep behind the Curtain; Or, the New Rehearsal. Bon Ton; Or, High Life above Stairs

By David Garrick; Louise Brown Osborn | Go to book overview

Sir John. The world's at an end! here's fine work; here are precious doings! this Lord is a pillar of the state too; no wonder that the building is in danger with such rotten supporters;--heigh-ho!--and then my poor Lady Minikin, what a friend and husband she is blessed with!--Let me consider!--Should I tell the good woman of these pranks, I may only make more mischief, and mayhap, go near to kill her, for she's as tender as she's virtuous;--poor Lady! I'll e'en go and comfort her directly, endeavour to draw her from the wickedness of this town into the country, where she shall have reading, fowling, and fishing, to keep up her spirits, and when I die, I will leave her that part of my fortune, with which I intended to reward the virtues of Miss Lucretia Tittup, with a plague to her. [Exit.


SCENE III Lady Minikin's Apartments.

Lady Minikin and Colonel Tivy discovered.

Lady Min. Don't urge it, Colonel; I can't think of coming home from the masquerade this evening. Though I should pass for my niece, it would make an uproar among the servants; and perhaps from the mistake break off your match with Tittup.

Col. Tiv. My dear Lady Minikin, you know my marriage with your niece is only a secondary consideration; my first and principal object is you--you, Madam! --therefore, my dear Lady, give me your promise to leave the ball with me; you must, Lady Minikin; a bold young fellow and a soldier as I am, ought not to be kept from plunder when the town has capitulated.

Lady Min. But it has not capitulated, and perhaps

-118-

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The Lying Valet: A Peep behind the Curtain; Or, the New Rehearsal. Bon Ton; Or, High Life above Stairs
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • ILLUSTRATIONS vii
  • Introduction ix
  • The Lying Valet. 1
  • SCENE II. MELISSA'S Lodgings. 13
  • ACT II. 22
  • EPILOGUE, 44
  • A Peep Behind the Curtain; Or, The New Rehearsal. 47
  • PROLOGUE. 51
  • A PEEP BEHIND THE CURTAIN; OR, The New Rehearsal. 53
  • SCENE II. The Playhouse. 56
  • ACT II. The Stage. 74
  • Bon Ton; Or, High Life Above Stairs. 91
  • PROLOGUE, Written by GEORGE COLMAN. Spoken by Mr. KING. 95
  • ACT I. 99
  • SCENE III Lady Minikin's Apartments. 118
  • ACT II. 122
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