The Lying Valet: A Peep behind the Curtain; Or, the New Rehearsal. Bon Ton; Or, High Life above Stairs

By David Garrick; Louise Brown Osborn | Go to book overview

ACT II.

SCENE I.

Enter Sir Johnand Jessamy.

Sir John. There is no bearing this! what a land are we in! Upon my word, Mr. Jessamy, you should look well to the house; there are certainly rogues about it: for I did but cross the way just now to the Pamphletshop, to buy a touch of the times, and they have taken my hanger from my side; ay, and had a pluck at my watch too, but I heard of their tricks, and had it sewed to my pocket.

Jess. Don't be alarmed, Sir John; 'tis a very common thing, and if you will walk the streets without convoy, you will be picked up by privateers of all kinds; ha, ha!

Sir John.. Not be alarmed when I am robbed!--why, they might have cut my throat with my own hanger; I shan't sleep a wink all night; so pray lend me some weapon of defence, for I am sure if they attack me in the open street, they'll be with me at night again.

Jess. I'll lend you my own sword, Sir John; but be assured there's no danger; there's robbing and murder cried every night under my window; but it no more disturbs me, than the ticking of my watch at my bed's head.

Sir John. Well, well, be that as it will, I must be upon my guard; what a dreadful place this is! But 'tis all owing to the corruption of the times; the great folks game, and the poor folks rob; no wonder that murder ensues; sad, sad, sad!--well, let me but get over this night, and I'll leave this den of thieves to-morrow;

-122-

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The Lying Valet: A Peep behind the Curtain; Or, the New Rehearsal. Bon Ton; Or, High Life above Stairs
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • ILLUSTRATIONS vii
  • Introduction ix
  • The Lying Valet. 1
  • SCENE II. MELISSA'S Lodgings. 13
  • ACT II. 22
  • EPILOGUE, 44
  • A Peep Behind the Curtain; Or, The New Rehearsal. 47
  • PROLOGUE. 51
  • A PEEP BEHIND THE CURTAIN; OR, The New Rehearsal. 53
  • SCENE II. The Playhouse. 56
  • ACT II. The Stage. 74
  • Bon Ton; Or, High Life Above Stairs. 91
  • PROLOGUE, Written by GEORGE COLMAN. Spoken by Mr. KING. 95
  • ACT I. 99
  • SCENE III Lady Minikin's Apartments. 118
  • ACT II. 122
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