Music in Shakespearean Tragedy

By F. W. Sternfeld | Go to book overview

NOTES ON TRANSCRIPTIONS

Appendix I

LONDON BOOK (British Museum Add. MS 15117, f. 18)

The melody has been printed by both Chappell and Wooldridge though with nineteenth-century harmonizations. Complete transcriptions of the original were made, amongst others, by Peter Warlock, E. H. Fellowes and J. P. Cutts. They appear in the following manner: Peter Warlock, ed., English Ayres, 6 vols., I.19 (1st edn., London: Enoch, 1922; 2nd edn. London: Oxford Press, 1927); E. H. Fellowes, "'The Willow Song'", in Noble, pp. 152-154; J. P. Cutts , "'A Reconsideration of the Willow Song'", Journal of the American Musicological Society, X ( 1957), 14-24.

In the London Book the music is notated on four braces, each brace composed of a five-line staff for the voice, with words beneath, and a six-line lute tablature. The fourth brace fills only half the width of the page, and into the remaining space the scribe compressed seven couplets representing stanzas II-VIII. For obvious limitations of space no refrain is given except 'sing etc.' or 'etc.'.

The first brace contains one scribal problem concerning the signs which give the length of notes above the lute tablature. In the early seventeenth century length was indicated either by stems and flags without heads or by conventional notes (semi-breves, minims, etc.). Here we have the usual stems and flags, but a second hand added two minims to bar 1. The voice has two minim rests in the first bar (indicated by strokes) and presumably the second scribe wished to indicate their length by the familiar note sign. It would make no musical sense to interpret these signs as anything but rests (in spite of their resemblance to the letter 'd'), and Warlock's example has been followed in the present transcription.

The second brace contains a scribal error in the voice part. At bar 16 the two notes for the word 'willow' should be placed one line higher. This emendation was made by Warlock and later editors.

The third brace contains a scribal error in the lute tablature. At bar 21 the first chord on the word 'all' reads

-39-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Music in Shakespearean Tragedy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.