Music in Shakespearean Tragedy

By F. W. Sternfeld | Go to book overview

Appendix I
Songs Sung by Ophelia in Act IV, Scene 5
Lines
23'How should I your true love know'
(Discussed above, p. 59.) Another use of the tune 'Wal-
singham'
is discussed below, s.v. line 164.
48'Tomorrow is Saint Valentine's Day'
(Discussed above, p. 62.)
164'They bore him barefaced on the bier'
No Elizabethan music is known for this lyric. It is sung tradi-
tionally to an adaptation of the tune 'Walsingham' which
serves also for 'How should I your true love know'. At other
times, the tune for 'And will he not come again' (line 190) has
been used, as shown in Music Example 3 (b), lower text.1
165'Hey non nony nony hey nony'
This incongruous line obviously does not belong to lines 164
and 166, cf. page 57. It is omitted in Q2, but occurs in F1.
170'You must sing down-a-down'
Another incongruous refrain line, discussed p. 57.
187'For bonny sweet robin is all my joy'
Discussed pages 57-58. The music appears in Appendix II
190'And will he not come again'
Again, no Elizabethan music is known. The traditional tune
is recorded in Knight Pictorial Shakespeare, based on the Drury
Lane tradition (Music Example 3b). The melody sounds like a
variant, in the minor mode, of 'The Merry Milkmaids', printed
in 1651 in Playford English Dancing Master (Example 3a).
Ophelia's second stanza seems to have been a target for satire,
as can be seen from Eastward Ho, a play of joint authorship,
produced in 1605.2
____________________
1
Caulfield II.87; Naylor191; Naylor SM 38.
2
C. Knight, Pictorial Edition of Shakespeare, 1839-42, Tragedies, I.153; Playford 29; Naylor191; Jonson IV.559 and IX.641 and IX.661.

-67-

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