The Battle of Alcazar: An Account of the Defeat of Don Sebastian of Portugal at El-Ksar El-Kebir

By E. W. Bovill | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 16
The Moors Re-arm

I T WAS EVIDENT that the proud position which Morocco now occupied in the world could only be preserved at the point of the sword with which the kingdom's new consequence had been won. For all their blandishments, the Powers were not to be trusted. The Turks were bitterly jealous of Moorish prestige and Murad was still smarting from the Shereef's insolent treatment of his envoy. The Christian states were at heart implacable enemies of Islam and any one of them might suddenly turn against the Moors on whose territory they were casting covetous eyes. Philip was still pressing for the cession of Larache to which the whole world seemed to attach an importance out of all proportion to its merits as a port. It was the ultimate objective of the Turks, and France and the Netherlands had shown an impertinent interest in its disposal.

Even Elizabeth was not to be trusted. There had been loose talk at the English court of a proposal to seize another Moorish port, Mogador. With this port in English hands "the Spanish forces abroad must be drawn into Spain to defend their own", wrote Roger Bodenham late in 1579. "Spain and Portugal (if they join in one) shall enjoy no peace nor town in Barbary longer than we will...it (the capture of Mogador) shall choke all Spanish traffic through the Straits.... It shall shut up the mouth of St Lucar with the bay of Cadiz, and be able to defeat his (Philip's) navy of the Indies...overthrow...all the bankers and counters who be the only nourishers of wars in our time...It will procure hereupon the revolt of the Indies" and so on.1

____________________
1
Public Record Office, State Papers, Domestic, Elizabeth, Vol. CXXXII, No. 17 apud de Castries ( Angleterre 1, p. 365).

-169-

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The Battle of Alcazar: An Account of the Defeat of Don Sebastian of Portugal at El-Ksar El-Kebir
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vi
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Chapter I - The Fear of the Moor 1
  • Chapter 2 - Don Sebastian 7
  • Chapter 3 - Mulai Mohammed 19
  • Chapter 4 - The Kingdom of Fez 25
  • Chapter 5 - Mulai Abd El-Malek 36
  • Chapter 6 - Queen Elizabeth's Secret 43
  • Chapter 7 - The Meetinq at Guadalupe 53
  • Chapter 8 - Ways and Means 62
  • Chapter 9 - Lisbon 74
  • Chapter 10 - Africa Invaded 89
  • Chapter 11 - The Road to El-Ksar 100
  • Chapter 12 - On the Plain of El-Ksar 114
  • Chapter 13 - The Battle 127
  • Chapter 14 - Philip I of Portugal 141
  • Chapter 15 - Mulai Ahmed El-Mansur 158
  • Chapter 16 - The Moors Re-Arm 169
  • Chapter 17 - El-Mansur and Elizabeth 175
  • Note on the Contemporary Accounts of The Battle of Alcazar 187
  • Bibliography 189
  • Index 192
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