Chichicastenango: A Guatemalan Village

By Ruth Bunzel | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
ECONOMIC LIFE

I 1 am the father of the house. We get up at five o'clock in the morning. There are many people who get up at three o'clock or even earlier.2 It is their custom, but we do not do that. First the woman gets up, as soon as the cocks crow. The real clock for the mornings is the crowing of the cocks, although we tell time also by the rising of the morning star. The woman hears the cocks crow, and she says to her husband, 'Now it is morning. Let us get up.' Then she gets up first and starts to build her fire. As soon as the fire is going the woman starts to grind for the morning meal. Then the man gets up and chops wood for the fire. If he wishes, he kneels in the patio as the sun rises and crosses himself. The man comes back with his firewood, and then goes right out to draw water to wash and for the uses of the household. Meanwhile the woman is preparing the tortillas, and at about half past eight or nine o'clock they eat their morning meal. They do not take anything when they get up in the morning; at least this was the way of the ancients, but now they make a mess with their coffee in the morning as soon as they get up.

After breakfast they all go about their work; the men to the fields or to whatever work they may have to do; the women sit down to weave. At one o'clock the men come in from the fields to rest a few minutes in the house. They take a drink, and then go back to their work. Then the woman lays aside her weaving and starts to prepare the afternoon meal. At three or half past three the meal is ready and they send one of the children to call the men from the fields. Then they come in and eat, and go back again to work. We Indians never sleep in the daytime like the Ladinos. At five o'clock the women put away their weaving and begin to clean and boil the corn for the next day's meals. At six o'clock the men return from their work. During the evening the women spin cotton, and wind the yarn to make it ready for the loom; the men stay in, making ropes and bags. We use sticks of ocote (pitch pine) for light; we have no candles. Before going to bed we have a drink of atole and perhaps tamales, or what is left. At nine o'clock we put out the fire and go to bed. We say a short prayer before sleeping: "God, protect me this night, and defend me from my enemies. And give me some sign in my dreams that I may know whether to expect good or evil fortune."

On rising in the morning one crosses oneself, gives thanks to God for good health, and prays that one may remain in health two or three days, two or three months, two or three years.

____________________
1
From a Quiché text.
2
Between two and three o'clock in the morning is the regular hour for the opening of ceremonies, for starting on a journey, or for going to ask for a wife.

-15-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Chichicastenango: A Guatemalan Village
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Table of Contents xxv
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - Economic Life 15
  • Chapter Two - Family Life 93
  • Chapter Three - Government 154
  • Chapter Four - Fiestas 192
  • Chapter Five - Man's Fate 261
  • Chapter Six - Rituals in Text Translations 305
  • Appendix I - The Market at Chichicastenango 404
  • Appendix II 410
  • Appendix III 412
  • Appendix IV - Dances 424
  • Appendix V 428
  • Glossary 430
  • Bibliography 433
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 446

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.