West Virginia, the Mountain State

By Charles H. Ambler; Festus P. Summers | Go to book overview

Chapter VI
The Revolution

TREATY OF PITTSBURGH, 1775

THE EARLY DEVELOPMENTS of the Revolution in Virginia greatly incensed her western inhabitants. Disappointed because of the results of Dunmore's War, their spirits were raised to the fighting point when they learned that Governor Dunmore had called off the negotiations then pending with neighboring Indian tribes, and was permitting the return of hostages. Nor was his decision to abandon Forts Dunmore ( Pitt), Blair ( Randolph), and Fincastle ( Henry) more cordially received. Temporarily forgetting their differences, the westerners reoccupied Fort Dunmore, renaming it Fort Pitt; they organized committees of safety; and, probably more significant still, they petitioned both the Virginia Assembly and the Continental Congress, setting forth their situation and asking for aid and guidance. As they could not hold Fort Blair, it was temporarily abandoned. Later it was rebuilt and named "Fort Randolph."

Both the Continental Congress and the Virginia Assembly resolved to complete the Pending negotiations with the Indians and to do everything in their power to enlist their friendship and neutrality. In pursuance of this purpose, Virginia sent among the Indians Captain James Wood, instructed to negotiate a permanent peace. He met with success, and, as a result, "the largest Indian delegation ever seen at this frontier post," Fort Pitt, assembled in September, 1775. Among them were "Ottawa and Wyandot from the neighborhood of Detroit; Mingo, Shawnee, and Delaware from the Ohio Valley; and Seneca from the upper Allegheny." A satisfactory treaty of peace, neutrality, and friendship was concluded.1

In its effects upon the frontier and the Revolution, the Treaty of Pittsburgh can hardly be overestimated; it clinched the results of the Battle of

____________________
1
For a text of the treaty negotiations, see Reuben G. Thwaites and Louise P. Kellogs, Revolution on the Upper Ohio, 1775-1777 ( Madison, Wis., 1908), pp. 25-127.

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
West Virginia, the Mountain State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 586

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.