West Virginia, the Mountain State

By Charles H. Ambler; Festus P. Summers | Go to book overview

Chapter XXI
Political Reconstruction 1865-1876

THE WAR BACKGROUND

ALTHOUGH SPARED the worst reconstruction experiences of the states which attempted to withdraw from the Union in 1861, West Virginia went through a similar transition. Separated into detached sectarian, factional, and clannish groups, as its inhabitants were, political unity was not easily attained. From the first, efforts to reach that goal were complicated also by the divided sympathies of her people with respect to the "Lost Cause." It will be recalled that they sent about one third as many soldiers to the Army of the Confederacy as they sent to the Army of the Union.1

To meet the resulting contingencies, a legislative act of 1863 declared forfeited to the state all property within her bounds belonging to her enemies. Although this law was somewhat of a dead letter from the first, it gave a semblance of authority to vigilant "home guards" bent upon vindicating loyalty, and to self-constituted authorities bent upon promiscuous maraudings and vengeance. Worse still, it was a constant menace to former Confederate sympathizers who were willing to accept the situation and to make the best of it.

At the same time, all officers, both state and local, were required to take

____________________
1
Among the best secondary accounts covering this period are: W. A. Dunning, Reconstruction, Political and Economic ( New York, 1907); J. F. Rhodes, History of the United States, Vols. V-VII ( New York, 1900- 1906); W. L. Fleming, The Sequel of Appomattox ( New Haven, 1919), and Documentary History of Reconstruction, 2 vols. ( Cleveland, 1906- 1907); H. J. Eckenrode, The Political History of Virginia during the Reconstruction ( Baltimore, 1904); J. G. Randall, Constitutional Problems under Lincoln ( New York, 1926).

-264-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
West Virginia, the Mountain State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 586

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.