West Virginia, the Mountain State

By Charles H. Ambler; Festus P. Summers | Go to book overview

Chapter XXX
The Industrial Revolution

AS PREDICTED BY THE FOUNDERS of West Virginia, development of her natural resources converted her into a great industrial state. The possibilities of such a development had been foreseen before the Civil War; but, owing to unsettled conditions during the War and the Reconstruction, little progress was made, except in the petroleum and iron industries. Other developments had to wait improved transportation and adequate financing. The New State was thus left in the domestic stage of economy. In this stage each county had its gristmills, sawmills, and carding machines; woolen mills made cloth, jeans, linseys, and flannels; and more than worth of these goods, including blankets, hosiery, and carpets, were produced in homes. Except the carding, every operation from the shearing of the wool to its conversion by the loom was performed within the family circle. Cities and towns were few and far between, and each village or community had its tannery, blacksmith shop, livery stable, and general store. Farmers slaughtered their own hogs, sheet, and cattle; cured and preserved their own meats; and fabricated their own tools and farm implements. From maple sap and sorghum juice they produced syrup and molasses, while their wives were equally efficient in soap making, baking, knitting, weaving, and tailoring. Granaries bulged with grain; barns were filled with hay and fodder; and cellars were storage places for canned fruits and vegetables. Money for taxes was usually secured through the sale of farm products, particularly cattle, hogs, and sheep, and, in the more remote parts, through the sale of ginseng, poultry, and peltry.


MANUFACTURING

By 1870 West Virginia had made a beginning in manufacturing. In that year the state had 2,444 industrial establishments employing more

-423-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
West Virginia, the Mountain State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 586

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.