Drug Warriors and Their Prey: From Police Power to Police State

By Richard Lawrence Miller | Go to book overview

5
ANNIHILATION

Killing is the ultimate element of the destruction process.

Years of hate propaganda against a group of ordinary people promotes a climate of public opinion supporting demands that victims be prohibited from living in ordinary society. Such a climate also promotes demands that victims be prohibited from living at all. And once a society accepts that latter premise, mass murder is no harder to organize than any previous element of the destruction process.

We know this from historical experience. In an earlier book, I showed why mass murder evolved from a war on Jews, a group of ordinary people. Early German perpetrators of the war on Jews condemned any suggestion that victims should be killed. After fifty years of hate propaganda and social discrimination, however, killing became an easy choice in a European country that cherished ideals of Western civilization. In the United States, mass murder is no more impossible than mass incarceration. Necessary legal doctrines grow in strength, as does the necessary climate of public opinion. Unlike Germans, however, Americans have the advantage of knowing what happens if the destruction process is allowed to continue. We can choose to stop the madness if we just say no.

Although Nazi death camps provide the most enduring image of annihilation, camps were not the first annihilation technique used by Nazis. Death squads hunted victims, individuals were beaten by thugs, disease was promoted as medical treatment was withheld, unemployment and other despairs promoted suicide, childbearing was discouraged both by law and by poisoning family life. As we shall see, all of those techniques have been used by drug warriors, and still we hear cries to go further. The call to kill millions of drug users is now rhetoric, but such calls were once mere words in Germany as well. We have seen how more and more persons and organizations have a growing stake in the war

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Drug Warriors and Their Prey: From Police Power to Police State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • PREFACE: THE DESTRUCTION PROCESS ix
  • 1 - Identification 1
  • 2 - Ostracism 35
  • 3 - Confiscation 91
  • 4- CONCENTRATION 143
  • 5 - Annihilation 163
  • Coda: The Creation of Utopia 189
  • SOURCES 235
  • Index 251
  • About the Author *
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